The Intensive Cognitive-Communication Rehabilitation Program for Young Adults With Acquired Brain Injury Purpose This study investigated the effects of an intensive cognitive-communication rehabilitation (ICCR) program for young individuals with chronic acquired brain injury. Method ICCR included classroom lectures; metacognitive instruction, modeling, and application; technology skills training; and individual cognitive–linguistic therapy. Four individuals participated in the intensive program (6 hr with ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   November 16, 2018
The Intensive Cognitive-Communication Rehabilitation Program for Young Adults With Acquired Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Natalie Gilmore
    Aphasia Research Laboratory, Speech and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Katrina Ross
    Aphasia Research Laboratory, Speech and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Swathi Kiran
    Aphasia Research Laboratory, Speech and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Disclosure: There are no financial conflicts of interest for Natalie Gilmore or Katrina Ross. Swathi Kiran discloses that she is a Scientific Advisor and Consultant for Constant Therapy/The Learning Corporation.
    Disclosure: There are no financial conflicts of interest for Natalie Gilmore or Katrina Ross. Swathi Kiran discloses that she is a Scientific Advisor and Consultant for Constant Therapy/The Learning Corporation. ×
  • Correspondence to Natalie Gilmore: ngilmore@bu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Melissa Duff
    Editor: Melissa Duff×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   November 16, 2018
The Intensive Cognitive-Communication Rehabilitation Program for Young Adults With Acquired Brain Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0153
History: Received September 15, 2017 , Revised January 17, 2018 , Accepted May 17, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0153
History: Received September 15, 2017; Revised January 17, 2018; Accepted May 17, 2018

Purpose This study investigated the effects of an intensive cognitive-communication rehabilitation (ICCR) program for young individuals with chronic acquired brain injury.

Method ICCR included classroom lectures; metacognitive instruction, modeling, and application; technology skills training; and individual cognitive–linguistic therapy. Four individuals participated in the intensive program (6 hr with 1-hr lunch break × 4 days × 12 weeks of treatment): 3 participants completed 3 consecutive semesters, and 1 participant completed 1 semester. Two controls did not receive treatment and completed assessments before and after the 12-week treatment interval only.

Results All 4 experimental participants demonstrated significant improvements on at least 1 standardized cognitive–linguistic measure, whereas controls did not. Furthermore, time point significantly predicted participants' scores on 2 of the 4 standardized outcome measures, indicating that as duration in ICCR increased, scores also increased. Participants who completed multiple semesters of ICCR also improved in their therapy and personal goals, classroom behavior, life participation, and quality of life.

Conclusion After ICCR, participants showed gains in their cognitive–linguistic functioning, classroom participation, and individual therapy. They also demonstrated improvements outside the classroom and in their overall well-being. There is a gap between the large population of young adults with acquired brain injury who wish to return to higher education and a lack of rehabilitation programs supporting reentry into academic environments; ICCR is a first step in reducing that gap.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by an internal grant through Boston University (PI: Swathi Kiran) and T32DC0130170 (PI: Christopher Moore). The authors thank the participants, families, and caregivers for their support and belief in the program. In addition, they extend their gratitude to Natalie Albrittain-Ross for developing course content and serving as a course instructor for two semesters. The authors thank Rachel Ryskin for her assistance with data analysis and plotting using R and R Studio. Finally, they appreciate Carrie Des Roches, Deirdre McLaughlin, Heather Wolfe, Shreya Chaturvedi, and Lindsey Foo for their assistance with data collection, classroom support, and program development.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access