How Gender Stereotypes May Limit Female Faculty Advancement in Communication Sciences and Disorders Purpose The field of communication sciences and disorders (CSD) faces a critical shortage of the faculty essential to train the future workforce of speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Despite a predominance of women in the field, men receive doctoral degrees, tenure status, academic leadership positions, and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association awards at ... Viewpoint
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Viewpoint  |   October 31, 2018
How Gender Stereotypes May Limit Female Faculty Advancement in Communication Sciences and Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicole Rogus-Pulia
    Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin–Madison
    Division of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin–Madison
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin–Madison
    William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Madison, WI
  • Ianessa Humbert
    College of Health and Health Professions, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Swallowing Systems Core, University of Florida, Gainesville
    College of Public Health and Health Professions, Center for Respiratory Research and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Christine Kolehmainen
    Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin–Madison
    William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Madison, WI
  • Molly Carnes
    Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin–Madison
    William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Madison, WI
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin–Madison
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin–Madison
    Women in Science & Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI), University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Nicole Rogus-Pulia: npulia@wisc.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Shelley Brundage
    Editor: Shelley Brundage×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Newly Published / Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   October 31, 2018
How Gender Stereotypes May Limit Female Faculty Advancement in Communication Sciences and Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0140
History: Received September 4, 2017 , Revised February 19, 2018 , Accepted June 20, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0140
History: Received September 4, 2017; Revised February 19, 2018; Accepted June 20, 2018

Purpose The field of communication sciences and disorders (CSD) faces a critical shortage of the faculty essential to train the future workforce of speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Despite a predominance of women in the field, men receive doctoral degrees, tenure status, academic leadership positions, and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association awards at disproportionately higher rates than women. The purpose of this review is to explore how implicit gender bias may contribute to female faculty advancement, including current and projected faculty workforce shortages, and to propose tangible solutions.

Method The authors present proportions of men and women who receive doctoral degrees, advance to each faculty rank, receive tenure status, hold department chairs in CSD, and receive American Speech-Language-Hearing Association honors and awards. They review ways in which cultural stereotypes give rise to implicit gender bias and discuss myriad ways that implicit gender bias may influence the decisions of students considering an academic career in CSD and their career trajectories.

Conclusions Cultural stereotypes about men and women lead to implicit gender bias that may have real consequences for female faculty advancement in CSD. Such implicit bias can influence career selection and outcomes within the field in multiple ways. To ensure that CSD continues to attract top talent and maintain a robust pipeline of future faculty in doctoral training programs, the field must recognize the existence of implicit gender bias and implement evidence-based strategies to minimize its potentially damaging effects on the future of the profession.

Acknowledgments
Carnes's research on scientific workforce diversity is supported by the National Institutes of Health Grant R35 GM122557. This article was partially prepared within the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center at the William S. Middleton Veteran Affairs Hospital in Madison, WI (GRECC Manuscript #008-2018). The views and content expressed in this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position, policy, or official views of the Department of Veteran Affairs or the U.S. government.
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