Writing Changes and Perceptions After Traumatic Brain Injury: “Oh, by the way, I can't write” Purpose Language and cognitive disruptions following traumatic brain injury (TBI) can negatively affect written expression and may result in increased difficulty achieving academic, vocational, social, and personal goals; however, scarce literature exists about TBI's effect on writing abilities. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences and ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   October 26, 2018
Writing Changes and Perceptions After Traumatic Brain Injury: “Oh, by the way, I can't write”
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carly Dinnes
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Karen Hux
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    Quality Living, Omaha, NE
  • Morgan Holmen
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Alaina Martens
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Megan Smith
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Carly Dinnes: carly.dinnes@huskers.unl.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Kristie Spencer
    Editor: Kristie Spencer×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   October 26, 2018
Writing Changes and Perceptions After Traumatic Brain Injury: “Oh, by the way, I can't write”
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-18-0025
History: Received January 27, 2018 , Revised April 11, 2018 , Accepted June 19, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-18-0025
History: Received January 27, 2018; Revised April 11, 2018; Accepted June 19, 2018

Purpose Language and cognitive disruptions following traumatic brain injury (TBI) can negatively affect written expression and may result in increased difficulty achieving academic, vocational, social, and personal goals; however, scarce literature exists about TBI's effect on writing abilities. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences and perceptions of people with TBI regarding their engagement in writing activities.

Method A transcendental phenomenological design structured the research. Data collection from 11 adults with TBI included gathering demographic and background information, completion of a TBI Symptom Checklist, and engagement in semistructured interviews.

Results Four major themes and 21 subthemes about postinjury writing recovery and current writing status emerged from the data analysis. Participants reported the extent to which writing difficulties interfered with daily activities and identified support strategies used to address persistent challenges.

Conclusion Understanding the writing experiences and perceptions of people with TBI can guide professionals in designing assessments and interventions to facilitate educational, vocational, social, and personal success following injury.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access