Challenges and Strategies for Speech-Language Pathologists Using the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering Purpose The Lidcombe program is a treatment for preschool-age children who stutter. Studies indicate that its implementation is not always straightforward. In this study, challenges that parents and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) encounter when implementing the Lidcombe program were identified, and strategies to address them were sought. Method In ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 19, 2018
Challenges and Strategies for Speech-Language Pathologists Using the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sabine Van Eerdenbrugh
    Thomas More University College, Antwerp, Belgium
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney
  • Sue O'Brian
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Mark Onslow: Mark.Onslow@uts.edu.au
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sharon Millard
    Editor-in-Chief: Sharon Millard×
  • Editor: Sharon Millard
    Editor: Sharon Millard×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 19, 2018
Challenges and Strategies for Speech-Language Pathologists Using the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, October 2018, Vol. 27, 1259-1272. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-ODC11-17-0185
History: Received November 15, 2017 , Revised February 18, 2018 , Accepted June 4, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, October 2018, Vol. 27, 1259-1272. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-ODC11-17-0185
History: Received November 15, 2017; Revised February 18, 2018; Accepted June 4, 2018
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The Lidcombe program is a treatment for preschool-age children who stutter. Studies indicate that its implementation is not always straightforward. In this study, challenges that parents and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) encounter when implementing the Lidcombe program were identified, and strategies to address them were sought.

Method In Part 1, Lidcombe program treatment challenges were determined from 4 sources. In Part 2, 7 SLPs with 15 to 23 years of Lidcombe program experience were interviewed to develop strategies to respond to the identified treatment challenges.

Result A template of the themes and a report with possible strategies are the outcomes of this study. A total of 124 themes were identified, mostly related to the implementation of Lidcombe program procedures. Strategies to deal with these challenges were formulated.

Conclusions This study provides treatment challenges that parents or SLPs may encounter during the Lidcombe program. It also provides strategies that SLPs can suggest to address them. An added contribution of the findings is that SLPs in the clinic can now anticipate the sort of treatment challenges that parents may face. A summary of the findings will be made available on the Australian Stuttering Research Centre website and through the Lidcombe Program Trainers Consortium.

Acknowledgments
This study was conducted with the support of Program Grant 633007 from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, awarded to Mark Onslow, Ann Packman, and Ross Menzies.
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