The Role of Narratives in the Development of Stuttering as a Problem Purpose Narratives are how people make sense of experiences and give meaning to their lives (Bruner, 1990). Use of narrative therapy (White, 2007) with people who stutter to facilitate the development of preferred stories (as opposed to problem-based stories) has been documented in the literature (Logan, 2013; Ryan, O'Dwyer, & ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 19, 2018
The Role of Narratives in the Development of Stuttering as a Problem
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary O'Dwyer
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
    Cork Kerry Community Healthcare, Tralee, Ireland
  • Irene P. Walsh
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
  • Margaret M. Leahy
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Mary O'Dwyer: odwyermp@tcd.ie
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sharon Millard
    Editor-in-Chief: Sharon Millard×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 19, 2018
The Role of Narratives in the Development of Stuttering as a Problem
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, October 2018, Vol. 27, 1164-1179. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-ODC11-17-0207
History: Received November 21, 2017 , Revised March 19, 2018 , Accepted May 18, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, October 2018, Vol. 27, 1164-1179. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-ODC11-17-0207
History: Received November 21, 2017; Revised March 19, 2018; Accepted May 18, 2018
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Narratives are how people make sense of experiences and give meaning to their lives (Bruner, 1990). Use of narrative therapy (White, 2007) with people who stutter to facilitate the development of preferred stories (as opposed to problem-based stories) has been documented in the literature (Logan, 2013; Ryan, O'Dwyer, & Leahy, 2015). The purpose of this research was to explore the role of narratives in the development of stuttering as a problem for people who stutter. This research sought to describe how these narratives develop and to identify the factors that influence this development.

Method Narratives from 6 men who stutter were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using the “Listening Guide” (Brown & Gilligan, 1992). This is a voice-centered relational method.

Results Findings indicate interaction between participants' narratives about stuttering and their wider self-narratives. Influencing factors identified include relationships, thoughts and feelings, and the dominant stories about stuttering in relevant social structures. An individual's consciousness of these influences was found to be integral to change in their narratives.

Conclusions The findings point to the importance of considering the environment, including significant relationships and social structures, in our understanding of stuttering. They also provide insights regarding intrapersonal and interpersonal processes, which can influence the development of stuttering or pave the way to stuttering becoming less problematic for the person who stutters.

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