Nurturing a Resilient Mindset in School-Aged Children Who Stutter Purpose To consider the rationale, methods, and potential benefits of nurturing the growth of resilience in school-aged children who stutter. Stuttering in childhood can have negative psychological consequences for some, including the development of a negative attitude toward their speech from a young age (Vanryckeghem, Brutten, & Hernandez, 2005) and ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   October 19, 2018
Nurturing a Resilient Mindset in School-Aged Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah Caughter
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering, London, United Kingdom
  • Victoria Crofts
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering, London, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference.×
  • Correspondence to Sarah Caughter: sarah.caughter@nhs.net
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sharon Millard
    Editor-in-Chief: Sharon Millard×
  • Editor: Shelley Brundage
    Editor: Shelley Brundage×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Issue: The 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   October 19, 2018
Nurturing a Resilient Mindset in School-Aged Children Who Stutter
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, October 2018, Vol. 27, 1111-1123. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-ODC11-17-0189
History: Received November 16, 2017 , Revised February 21, 2018 , Accepted March 18, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, October 2018, Vol. 27, 1111-1123. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-ODC11-17-0189
History: Received November 16, 2017; Revised February 21, 2018; Accepted March 18, 2018
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose To consider the rationale, methods, and potential benefits of nurturing the growth of resilience in school-aged children who stutter. Stuttering in childhood can have negative psychological consequences for some, including the development of a negative attitude toward their speech from a young age (Vanryckeghem, Brutten, & Hernandez, 2005) and possible co-occurring psychopathology in adolescence and adulthood, in particular, anxiety disorders (Blood, Blood, Maloney, Meyer, & Qualls, 2007; Iverach & Rapee, 2014; McAllister, Kelman, & Millard, 2015). Children who stutter also frequently report teasing and bullying by their peers (Blood & Blood, 2007; Boyle, 2011; Langevin, Packman, & Onslow, 2009), which can have a significant impact on children's confidence and psychological well-being. However, the capacity of children who stutter to cope or “bounce back” from adversity is not routinely explored or incorporated in therapy for stuttering.

Method This clinical focus article will explore the construct of resilience and consider why it may be important for children who stutter and their parents. A framework for understanding resilience in relation to stuttering is used, drawing from the Reaching In Reaching Out Resiliency Program (for children aged under 8 years and their parents) and the Penn Resiliency Program (for children aged 8 years and over).

Conclusions The role of parents is key in modeling resilient responses to children and creating a resilience-rich environment. As children who stutter may be more vulnerable to adversity, some may benefit from targeted support to build their resilience, in order to enhance their ability to overcome challenges and thrive.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to acknowledge the children, the young people, and their families at the Michael Palin Centre who have inspired and taught the authors, as well as the team of therapists, Action for Stammering Children and National Health Service Whittington Health, and Reaching In, Reaching Out for their permission for use of their theoretical framework for resilience.
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