Changing Nonstuttering Preschool Children's Stuttering Attitudes Purpose Negative or uninformed stuttering attitudes proliferate among the general public, and bourgeoning research has shown that such attitudes might emerge as early as the preschool years. Much remains unknown about young children's stuttering attitudes, and conclusive recommendations to improve attitudes toward stuttering have yet to be advanced. This study ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 21, 2018
Changing Nonstuttering Preschool Children's Stuttering Attitudes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary E. Weidner
    Department of Communication Disorders, Marshall University, Huntington, WV
  • Kenneth O. St. Louis
    West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • Haley L. Glover
    West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Mary E. Weidner: m.e.weidner@gmail.com
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Stacy Betz
    Editor: Stacy Betz×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 21, 2018
Changing Nonstuttering Preschool Children's Stuttering Attitudes
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2018, Vol. 27, 1445-1457. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-18-0019
History: Received January 21, 2018 , Revised April 22, 2018 , Accepted June 1, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2018, Vol. 27, 1445-1457. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-18-0019
History: Received January 21, 2018; Revised April 22, 2018; Accepted June 1, 2018

Purpose Negative or uninformed stuttering attitudes proliferate among the general public, and bourgeoning research has shown that such attitudes might emerge as early as the preschool years. Much remains unknown about young children's stuttering attitudes, and conclusive recommendations to improve attitudes toward stuttering have yet to be advanced. This study sought to determine the effect of a new educational program on improving stuttering attitudes among preschool children using objective measures.

Method Thirty-seven preschool children learned about stuttering and sensitive peer interactions by participating in the newly developed Attitude Change and Tolerance program. The program teaches children about human differences with an emphasis on stuttering and how to interact with people who stutter. Children's stuttering attitudes were measured using the Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes–Stuttering/Child (Weidner & St. Louis, 2014) before and after the program.

Results Pre–post comparisons showed statistically significant improvements in children's overall stuttering attitudes. In particular, children demonstrated gains relative to their perceptions of and reactions toward people who stutter.

Conclusion This study provides empirical evidence that young children's stuttering attitudes can be improved using the Attitude Change and Tolerance program. In addition, it supports previous research that negative stuttering attitudes emerge as early as preschool.

Acknowledgments
The first two authors share the copyright of the Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes–Stuttering/Child (POSHA-S/Child), and the first author owns the copyright to the InterACT program; both were used in this study. This dissertation study was funded in part by research grants from the College of Education and Human Services at West Virginia University and the National Stuttering Association.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access