Sense of Effort and Fatigue Associated With Talking After Total Laryngectomy Purpose Sense of effort and fatigue associated with talking was compared in individuals with and without a total laryngectomy. Method An online survey of individuals using tracheoesophageal speech (TES; n = 222), electrolaryngeal speech (ELS; n = 132), esophageal speech (n = 41), and laryngeal speech (LS; n ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 21, 2018
Sense of Effort and Fatigue Associated With Talking After Total Laryngectomy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeff Searl
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Stephanie Knollhoff
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Stephanie Knollhoff is now at Utah State University.
    Stephanie Knollhoff is now at Utah State University.×
  • Correspondence to Jeff Searl, who is now at the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders at Michigan State University: searljef@msu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 21, 2018
Sense of Effort and Fatigue Associated With Talking After Total Laryngectomy
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2018, Vol. 27, 1434-1444. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0218
History: Received December 8, 2017 , Revised April 20, 2018 , Accepted May 18, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2018, Vol. 27, 1434-1444. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0218
History: Received December 8, 2017; Revised April 20, 2018; Accepted May 18, 2018

Purpose Sense of effort and fatigue associated with talking was compared in individuals with and without a total laryngectomy.

Method An online survey of individuals using tracheoesophageal speech (TES; n = 222), electrolaryngeal speech (ELS; n = 132), esophageal speech (n = 41), and laryngeal speech (LS; n = 112) asked about 3 domains of effort when talking: frequency of occurrence, withdrawal from talking, and location in the body. Three aspects of fatigue were explored: frequency of occurrence, fatigue type, and duration of talking before fatigue.

Results Alaryngeal groups reported significantly more talking-related effort and fatigue than the LS group. Sixty-three percent of all respondents indicated that effort caused them to talk less, with no group differences on this item. Significantly more effort was localized to the lips and tongue by ELS compared with TES and LS groups. Both the ELS and TES groups had higher shoulder/arm effort when talking compared with the esophageal speech and LS groups. ELS respondents reported less fatigue than the TES group. When fatigue was present, the TES group had more physical and less mental fatigue than the ELS group. The duration of talking before experiencing fatigue was significantly shorter for the alaryngeal groups compared with the LS group.

Conclusions Effort and fatigue associated with talking are a common report for individuals using alaryngeal speech. The location of effort within the body and the type of fatigue experienced vary to some extent across alaryngeal speaking methods.

Acknowledgments
Angela Dietsch was instrumental in the early development of the survey and initial launching of the online survey. Brittany Boddicker and Molly Thurman provided significant assistance with data entry and coding as graduate research assistants.
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