An Integrative Analysis of Spontaneous Storytelling Discourse in Aphasia: Relationship With Listeners' Rating and Prediction of Severity and Fluency Status of Aphasia Purpose This study investigated which of the three analytic approaches of oral discourse, including linguistically based measures, proposition-based measures, and story grammar, best correlated with aphasia severity and with naïve listeners' ratings on aphasic productions. The predictive power of these analytic approaches to aphasia severity and fluency status of people ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 21, 2018
An Integrative Analysis of Spontaneous Storytelling Discourse in Aphasia: Relationship With Listeners' Rating and Prediction of Severity and Fluency Status of Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anthony Pak-Hin Kong
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Cherie Wan-Yin Wong
    Department of Special Education and Counselling, The Education University of Hong Kong
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Anthony Pak-Hin Kong: antkong@ucf.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 21, 2018
An Integrative Analysis of Spontaneous Storytelling Discourse in Aphasia: Relationship With Listeners' Rating and Prediction of Severity and Fluency Status of Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2018, Vol. 27, 1491-1505. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-18-0015
History: Received January 17, 2018 , Revised May 8, 2018 , Accepted June 4, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2018, Vol. 27, 1491-1505. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-18-0015
History: Received January 17, 2018; Revised May 8, 2018; Accepted June 4, 2018

Purpose This study investigated which of the three analytic approaches of oral discourse, including linguistically based measures, proposition-based measures, and story grammar, best correlated with aphasia severity and with naïve listeners' ratings on aphasic productions. The predictive power of these analytic approaches to aphasia severity and fluency status of people with aphasia (PWA) was examined. Finally, which approach best discriminated fluent versus nonfluent PWA was determined.

Method Audio files and orthographic transcriptions of the storytelling task “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” from 68 PWA and 68 controls were extracted from the Cantonese AphasiaBank. Each transcript was analyzed using these 3 systems.

Results The linguistic approach of discourse analysis best correlated with aphasia severity and naïve listeners' subjective ratings. Although both linguistically based and proposition-based measures significantly predicted aphasia severity, a subset of linguistic measures focusing on the quantity and efficiency of production were particularly useful for clinical estimation of the fluency status of aphasia.

Conclusions The linguistically based measures appeared to be the most clinically effective and powerful in reflecting PWA's performance of spoken discourse.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant funded by the National Institutes of Health to Anthony Pak-Hin Kong (PI) and Sam-Po Law (Co-I; Project NIH-R01-DC010398). Special thanks to the staff members in the following organizations (in alphabetical order) for their help in participant recruitment: Christian Family Service Center (Kwun Tong Community Rehabilitation Day Center), Community Rehabilitation Network of The Hong Kong Society for Rehabilitation, Internal Aphasia Clinic at the University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Stroke Association, Lee Quo Wei Day Rehabilitation and Care Centre of The Hong Kong Society for Rehabilitation, and Self-Help Group for the Brain Damaged. The authors would also like to acknowledge the invaluable contribution of the people living with aphasia and all listeners who participated in this study.
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