Acquisition and Generalization Responses in Aphasia Naming Treatment: A Meta-Analysis of Semantic Feature Analysis Outcomes Purpose This meta-analysis synthesizes results from published studies that used semantic feature analysis (SFA) treatment to improve naming for people with aphasia. It examines how both person- and treatment-related variables affected the likelihood of correct naming responses in individual probe sessions for both acquisition (treated) and generalization (untreated) stimuli. ... Review Article
Newly Published
Review Article  |   September 12, 2018
Acquisition and Generalization Responses in Aphasia Naming Treatment: A Meta-Analysis of Semantic Feature Analysis Outcomes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yina M. Quique
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, PA
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • William S. Evans
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, PA
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • Michael Walsh Dickey
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, PA
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Yina M. Quique: yinaquique@pitt.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Lisa Edmonds
    Editor: Lisa Edmonds×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Newly Published / Review Article
Review Article   |   September 12, 2018
Acquisition and Generalization Responses in Aphasia Naming Treatment: A Meta-Analysis of Semantic Feature Analysis Outcomes
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0155
History: Received September 15, 2017 , Revised February 16, 2018 , Accepted April 22, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0155
History: Received September 15, 2017; Revised February 16, 2018; Accepted April 22, 2018

Purpose This meta-analysis synthesizes results from published studies that used semantic feature analysis (SFA) treatment to improve naming for people with aphasia. It examines how both person- and treatment-related variables affected the likelihood of correct naming responses in individual probe sessions for both acquisition (treated) and generalization (untreated) stimuli.

Method The meta-analysis compiled data from 12 studies analyzing a total of 35 participants with aphasia. It used mixed-effects models as a novel statistical tool to examine the effects of 2 sets of variables on naming performance: treatment-related variables, including treatment phase (baseline vs. treatment), dosage (number of treatment sessions), and stimulus type (treated vs. untreated, semantically related vs. unrelated items), and person-specific variables, including degree of language impairment and demographic variables (age, time poststroke).

Results Results of the meta-analysis revealed that SFA intervention promoted increased naming accuracy during naming probes when comparing baseline and treatment phases. In addition, increased dosages of SFA were associated with increased naming accuracy, and treatment-related gains were larger for acquisition (treated) than generalization (untreated) stimuli, likewise for related versus unrelated generalization stimuli. Furthermore, a subset of person-specific variables was predictive of SFA-related gains: Language impairment variables were related to treatment-related changes in naming performance, but demographic variables were not.

Conclusion These results provide group-level evidence for the efficacy of SFA as well as preliminary estimates of how much naming performance benefit is engendered by varying dosages of SFA. The results also provide promising and previously unobserved evidence of potential person-level predictors of SFA treatment response.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Award I01RX000832 to the last author and the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. The authors are grateful to Dr. Julie Wambaugh and colleagues for sharing original data from their 2013 article, to Dr. William Hula for discussion and input regarding the statistical analysis, and to Beth Friedmann, Gina D'Amore, Anish Kumar, and Jack Snowdon for their work in data extraction. The contents of this article do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs of the U.S. Government.
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