Continuous Vocal Fry Simulated in Laboratory Subjects: A Preliminary Report on Voice Production and Listener Ratings Purpose Vocal fry is prevalent in everyday speech. However, whether the use of vocal fry is detrimental to voice production is unclear. This preliminary study assessed the effects of using continuous vocal fry on voice production measures and listener ratings. Method Ten healthy individuals (equal male and female, ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   August 28, 2018
Continuous Vocal Fry Simulated in Laboratory Subjects: A Preliminary Report on Voice Production and Listener Ratings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anumitha Venkatraman
    Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • M. Preeti Sivasankar
    Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Correspondence to M. Preeti Sivasankar: msivasan@purdue.edu
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 28, 2018
Continuous Vocal Fry Simulated in Laboratory Subjects: A Preliminary Report on Voice Production and Listener Ratings
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0212
History: Received November 28, 2017 , Revised March 20, 2018 , Accepted May 18, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0212
History: Received November 28, 2017; Revised March 20, 2018; Accepted May 18, 2018

Purpose Vocal fry is prevalent in everyday speech. However, whether the use of vocal fry is detrimental to voice production is unclear. This preliminary study assessed the effects of using continuous vocal fry on voice production measures and listener ratings.

Method Ten healthy individuals (equal male and female, mean age = 22.4 years) completed 2 counterbalanced sessions. In each session, participants read in continuous vocal fry or habitual voice quality for 30 min at a comfortable intensity. Continuous vocal fry was simulated. Phonation threshold pressure (PTP10 and PTP20), cepstral peak prominence, and vocal effort ratings were obtained before and after the production of each voice quality. Next, 10 inexperienced listeners (equal male and female, mean age = 24.1 years) used visual analog scales to rate paired samples of continuous vocal fry and habitual voice quality for naturalness, employability, and amount of listener concentration.

Results PTP10 and vocal effort ratings increased after 30 min of continuous vocal fry. Inexperienced listeners rated continuous vocal fry more negatively than the habitual voice quality.

Conclusions Thirty minutes of simulated, continuous vocal fry worsened some voice measures when compared with a habitual voice quality. Samples of continuous vocal fry were rated as significantly less employable, less natural, and requiring greater listener concentration as compared with samples of habitual voice quality. Future studies should include habitual users of vocal fry to investigate speech stimulability and adaptation with cueing to further understand pathogenesis of vocal fry.

Acknowledgments
Funding was provided by a National Institutes of Health T32 Training Grant 2T32DC000030-26 to the Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences at Purdue University. This work was based on a thesis by the first author submitted in partial fulfillment of the MS-SLP degree from the Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences at Purdue University. The authors thank the members of the MS-thesis committee Barbara Solomon, Georgia Malandraki, and Christine Weber for their insightful comments. Bruce Craig and Ryan Murphy at the Purdue University Statistical Consulting Services assisted with the statistical analysis. The authors also thank Robert Fujiki, Abigail Chapleau, and Sara Loerch for their contributions to the data analysis.
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