A Case Study Using a Multimodal Approach to Melodic Intonation Therapy Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy. of increasing spontaneous expressive language using a modified melodic intonation therapy (MIT) approach with a male participant diagnosed with acquired aphasia and apraxia who was 10 years post onset. Method A therapeutic protocol consisting of vocal and ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   August 14, 2018
A Case Study Using a Multimodal Approach to Melodic Intonation Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dianne Slavin
    LIU Post, Brookville, NY
  • Renee Fabus
    Health Sciences Center, School of Health Technology and Management, Stony Brook University, NY
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Dianne Slavin: Dianne.Slavin@liu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   August 14, 2018
A Case Study Using a Multimodal Approach to Melodic Intonation Therapy
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0030
History: Received March 3, 2017 , Revised May 15, 2017 , Accepted April 16, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0030
History: Received March 3, 2017; Revised May 15, 2017; Accepted April 16, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy. of increasing spontaneous expressive language using a modified melodic intonation therapy (MIT) approach with a male participant diagnosed with acquired aphasia and apraxia who was 10 years post onset.

Method A therapeutic protocol consisting of vocal and linguistic tasks was administered. The participant attended two 50-min individual sessions and a 4-hr/week socialization program for three 12-week semesters. Measures of speech and language were administered before intervention and at the completion of each of the 3 semesters.

Results At the completion of the study, the participant demonstrated reduced apraxia of speech as measured by The Apraxia Battery for Adults, Second Edition (Dabul, 2000). He also showed improvements in auditory comprehension skills as measured on the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Evaluation (Goodglass, Kaplan, & Barresi, 2000). His spontaneous utterances were characterized by an increased number of complete sentences and questions. Several language parameters including mean length of utterance, total number of spontaneous (untrained) utterances, and number of different words spoken were also improved as revealed through language analysis.

Conclusions Integration of melodic intonation therapy through the addition of musical elements may result in improved speech and expressive language skills when administered over a 9-month period in conjunction with a group socialization program.

Acknowledgments
The first author is employed at LIU and receives financial compensation for her employment. The second author has not received any financial compensation.
We would like to thank Mr. and Mrs. P for agreeing to take part in this study. Living with aphasia and the aftermath of stroke present many challenges. The road to recovery is long and hard. We are still headed toward the silver lining. We would also like to thank Harriet Ryan for her vital role in the design and administration of activities at the beginning of the study and Nicole Iorio and Ingrid Gicou for their time and the commitment they demonstrated to this project as research assistants.
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