Effects of Submental Surface Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing Kinematics in Healthy Adults: An Error-Based Learning Paradigm Purpose Hyoid bone and laryngeal approximation aid airway protection (laryngeal vestibule closure) while moving toward their peak superior and anterior positions during swallowing. Submental surface electrical stimulation (SES) is a therapeutic technique that targets the muscles that move the hyoid bone during swallowing. It is unknown whether submental SES only ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   August 03, 2018
Effects of Submental Surface Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing Kinematics in Healthy Adults: An Error-Based Learning Paradigm
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Selen Serel Arslan
    Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey
  • Alba Azola
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Kirstyn Sunday
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Alicia Vose
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Emily Plowman
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Lauren Tabor
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Michele Singer
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Raele Robison
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Ianessa A. Humbert
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ianessa Humbert: ihumbert@ufl.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Debra Suiter
    Editor: Debra Suiter×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   August 03, 2018
Effects of Submental Surface Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing Kinematics in Healthy Adults: An Error-Based Learning Paradigm
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0224
History: Received December 21, 2017 , Revised April 20, 2018 , Accepted April 25, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0224
History: Received December 21, 2017; Revised April 20, 2018; Accepted April 25, 2018

Purpose Hyoid bone and laryngeal approximation aid airway protection (laryngeal vestibule closure) while moving toward their peak superior and anterior positions during swallowing. Submental surface electrical stimulation (SES) is a therapeutic technique that targets the muscles that move the hyoid bone during swallowing. It is unknown whether submental SES only increases peak hyoid bone swallowing positions but not peak laryngeal swallowing positions, which could require faster or greater laryngeal movement to achieve adequate laryngeal vestibule closure.

Method We examined the effects of submental SES on hyo-laryngeal kinematics in 30 healthy adults who swallowed 50 times using an error-based learning paradigm.

Results Submental SES did not alter any hyo-laryngeal swallowing kinematic. However, submental SES significantly changed the starting position of the hyoid bone just prior to the swallow onset (more anterior; p = .003). On average, submental SES immediately prior to swallow onset can position the hyoid approximately 20% closer to its peak swallowing point.

Conclusions These findings indicate that electrical stimulation of the agonists for hyoid movement might not alter swallowing outcomes tested in this study. However, submental SES could have clinical utility by minimizing swallowing impairments related to reduced hyoid swallowing range of motion in individuals with dysphagia.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by National Institutes of Health Grant R01 DC014285, awarded to Humbert, and by American Heart Association Grant 14BGIA20380348, awarded to Humbert.
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