Comprehension of Single Versus Combined Modality Information by People With Aphasia Purpose Every adult with aphasia displays a unique constellation of language comprehension skills and varies in the benefit derived from different content presentation formats. For many, multiple modality presentation enhances comprehension. This study's purpose was to determine the comprehension benefits for people with mild, moderate, and severe aphasia when hearing, ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   July 27, 2018
Comprehension of Single Versus Combined Modality Information by People With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica A. Brown
    Department of Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Sarah E. Wallace
    Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Kelly Knollman-Porter
    Miami University, Oxford, OH
  • Karen Hux
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Jessica A. Brown: jessicabrown@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Margaret Blake
    Editor-in-Chief: Margaret Blake×
  • Editor: Jee Eun Sung
    Editor: Jee Eun Sung×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference. ×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 27, 2018
Comprehension of Single Versus Combined Modality Information by People With Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0132
History: Received August 22, 2017 , Revised December 21, 2017 , Accepted February 28, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0132
History: Received August 22, 2017; Revised December 21, 2017; Accepted February 28, 2018

Purpose Every adult with aphasia displays a unique constellation of language comprehension skills and varies in the benefit derived from different content presentation formats. For many, multiple modality presentation enhances comprehension. This study's purpose was to determine the comprehension benefits for people with mild, moderate, and severe aphasia when hearing, reading, or simultaneously hearing and reading single sentences.

Method Twenty-seven adults with aphasia performed a repeated-measures experiment across 3 conditions. Participants read and/or listened to sentence stimuli and selected from 4 images the 1 matching the sentence. Participants also indicated condition preference.

Results Participants demonstrated significantly greatest accuracy during simultaneous written and auditory stimulus presentation. Performance patterns varied within aphasia severity groups. Individuals with mild and moderate aphasia demonstrated minimal performance differences across conditions, and people with severe aphasia were significantly more accurate in the combined modality than the written-only modality. Overall, participants required the longest response time in the written-only condition; however, participants were most efficient with auditory content. Condition preferences did not always mirror accuracy; however, the majority reported a preference for combined content presentation.

Conclusions Results suggest some people with aphasia may benefit from combined auditory and written modalities to enhance comprehension efforts.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Meghan Kincaid, Caryssa McCool, and Elizabeth Ehly for their assistance with stimulus preparation and data collection.
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