Follow-Up on the Story Goodness Index for Characterizing Discourse Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury Purpose The Story Goodness Index (SGI) is a hybrid analysis of narrative discourse combining 2 macrostructural measures: story grammar and story completeness. Initially proposed by Lê and colleagues (Lê, Coelho, Mozeiko, & Grafman, 2011), the SGI is intended to characterize the discourse performance of individuals with cognitive–communication disorders. In this ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   July 27, 2018
Follow-Up on the Story Goodness Index for Characterizing Discourse Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • André Lindsey
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs
    Neurobiology of Language Training Program, University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Erin Hurley
    Cognitive Science Program, University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Jennifer Mozeiko
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs
    Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Carl Coelho
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs
    Cognitive Science Program, University of Connecticut, Storrs
    Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to André Lindsey: andre.lindsey@uconn.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Margaret Blake
    Editor-in-Chief: Margaret Blake×
  • Editor: Melissa Duff
    Editor: Melissa Duff×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 27, 2018
Follow-Up on the Story Goodness Index for Characterizing Discourse Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0151
History: Received September 15, 2017 , Revised February 7, 2018 , Accepted March 21, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0151
History: Received September 15, 2017; Revised February 7, 2018; Accepted March 21, 2018

Purpose The Story Goodness Index (SGI) is a hybrid analysis of narrative discourse combining 2 macrostructural measures: story grammar and story completeness. Initially proposed by Lê and colleagues (Lê, Coelho, Mozeiko, & Grafman, 2011), the SGI is intended to characterize the discourse performance of individuals with cognitive–communication disorders. In this study, the SGI was utilized to examine the discourse of 2 groups, one with closed head injuries and another with non–brain injured (NBI) peers. The intent of this study was to ascertain whether the SGI could differentiate the discourse performance of the 2 groups, as was previously reported for individuals with penetrating traumatic brain injury and an NBI comparison group (Lê, Coelho, Mozeiko, Krueger, & Grafman, 2012). Because of the retrospective nature of this study, the wordless visual narrative used to elicit discourse was different from the narrative used by Lê and colleagues (2012) .

Method A retrospective analysis of discourse was performed on 55 individuals with a history of closed head injury and 47 NBI socioeconomically matched peers. During the initial assessment, participants were engaged in a narrative retell task. Each participant was shown a wordless picture story and then asked to retell the story to the examiner. Story narratives were reanalyzed for story grammar (organization) and completeness (critical content).

Results A significant group difference was noted for the story grammar measure, but not for story completeness. Although the SGI plots depicted the heterogeneity in discourse performance of the 2 groups, a chi-square test of independence revealed no significant association between group membership and SGI quadrant.

Conclusions Findings from this study were inconsistent with those of Lê and colleagues. The studies did not use identical SGI protocols; specifically, different picture stimuli were used to elicit the story retells. Therefore, this study cannot be considered a replication. The story used by Lê and colleagues was judged to be more complex, requiring more inference for story interpretation. Future studies should interpret findings within the context of the story stimuli presented.

Acknowledgments
A researcher for this study (André Lindsey) was supported by National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship Program Grant DGE-1144399.
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