Effect Size Benchmarks for Response Elaboration Training: A Meta-Analysis Purpose With a number of single-case experimental design studies reporting the effects of treatment for response (and modified response) elaboration training (RET/M-RET), it is important to consolidate data over multiple participants to allow comparison within/between individuals and across similar treatments. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   July 27, 2018
Effect Size Benchmarks for Response Elaboration Training: A Meta-Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa D. Bunker
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Christina Nessler
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
  • Julie L. Wambaugh
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lisa Bunker: lisa.bunker@utah.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: Christos Salis
    Editor: Christos Salis×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 47th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 27, 2018
Effect Size Benchmarks for Response Elaboration Training: A Meta-Analysis
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0152
History: Received September 15, 2017 , Revised January 13, 2018 , Accepted March 29, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0152
History: Received September 15, 2017; Revised January 13, 2018; Accepted March 29, 2018

Purpose With a number of single-case experimental design studies reporting the effects of treatment for response (and modified response) elaboration training (RET/M-RET), it is important to consolidate data over multiple participants to allow comparison within/between individuals and across similar treatments. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of single-case experimental design studies of RET/M-RET and to determine effect size (ES) benchmarks to allow comparison to “group” data.

Method Database and bibliographical searches identified 20 investigations of RET/M-RET. Nine studies had sufficient experimental quality, compliance with the essential components of the RET protocol, and consistency in the dependent variable (i.e., accurate content production in response to picture stimuli) to be retained for the meta-analysis. Probe data for a total of 26 persons with aphasia (PWA) were extracted from published graphs (if raw data were not available) to calculate weighted ESs at the end of treatment and at follow-up for both treated and untreated stimuli. The first, second, and third quartiles of the distributions were used to serve at benchmarks for small, medium, and large effects.

Results Nearly all participants demonstrated positive effects as a result of RET/M-RET, indicating an association with positive changes in content production for PWA. Small, medium, and large benchmarks are reported for treated items after treatment and at follow-up, as well as for untreated items after treatment and at follow-up.

Conclusions With a larger sample of 26 participants, this analysis indicates that RET/M-RET are associated with positive changes in content production for PWA. ES benchmarks allow clinicians/researchers to compare an individual's performance across multiple applications of treatment to performance of other PWA and to other treatments with similar outcomes.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Small Projects in Rehabilitation Research RX001365-0 and Research Career Scientist Award 23727 from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service (each awarded to Julie Wambaugh). The contents do not represent the views of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Government. NCT 01979159.
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