Consistent Symbol Location Affects Motor Learning in Preschoolers Without Disabilities: Implications for Designing Augmentative and Alternative Communication Displays Purpose Designing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) displays that minimize operational demands is an important aspect of AAC intervention. The current study compared the effect of 2 display designs on the speed of locating target words by preschoolers without disabilities. Method Across 5 sessions, participants in the consistent ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   June 01, 2018
Consistent Symbol Location Affects Motor Learning in Preschoolers Without Disabilities: Implications for Designing Augmentative and Alternative Communication Displays
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer J. Thistle
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire
  • Stephanie A. Holmes
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire
  • Madeline M. Horn
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire
  • Alyson M. Reum
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jennifer Thistle, who is now at the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western Washington University, Bellingham: jennifer.thistle@wwu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: Ignatius Nip
    Editor: Ignatius Nip×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   June 01, 2018
Consistent Symbol Location Affects Motor Learning in Preschoolers Without Disabilities: Implications for Designing Augmentative and Alternative Communication Displays
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0129
History: Received August 19, 2017 , Revised December 14, 2017 , Accepted February 21, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0129
History: Received August 19, 2017; Revised December 14, 2017; Accepted February 21, 2018

Purpose Designing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) displays that minimize operational demands is an important aspect of AAC intervention. The current study compared the effect of 2 display designs on the speed of locating target words by preschoolers without disabilities.

Method Across 5 sessions, participants in the consistent condition (n = 12) were asked to locate symbols on arrays that did not change, whereas participants in the variable condition (n = 12) utilized arrays where the symbols changed locations each session.

Results No difference in response time across conditions was noted during the 1st session; however, by the 5th session, participants in the consistent condition demonstrated significantly faster response times than participants in the variable condition.

Conclusions The current study illustrated an advantage of consistent symbol location for preschoolers without disabilities. Clinical applications for incorporating consistent symbol location into AAC display design are discussed; however, replication with children who use AAC is critical.

Acknowledgments
Partial funding provided by the Vicki Lord Larson Faculty Research Fellowship and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs Summer Grant at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire, awarded to Jennifer Thistle.
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