Articulatory Range of Movement in Individuals With Dysarthria Secondary to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Purpose The current study examined overall articulatory range of movement (ROM) in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Differential involvement of articulators was also tested using articulatory working space in individuals with varying degrees of dysarthria severity and in typically aging individuals. A strong association between overall articulatory ROM and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 06, 2018
Articulatory Range of Movement in Individuals With Dysarthria Secondary to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jimin Lee
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Michael Bell
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jimin Lee: JXL91@psu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
  • Editor: Kristie Spencer
    Editor: Kristie Spencer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 06, 2018
Articulatory Range of Movement in Individuals With Dysarthria Secondary to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2018, Vol. 27, 996-1009. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0064
History: Received May 11, 2017 , Revised October 10, 2017 , Accepted February 20, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2018, Vol. 27, 996-1009. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0064
History: Received May 11, 2017; Revised October 10, 2017; Accepted February 20, 2018

Purpose The current study examined overall articulatory range of movement (ROM) in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Differential involvement of articulators was also tested using articulatory working space in individuals with varying degrees of dysarthria severity and in typically aging individuals. A strong association between overall articulatory ROM and severity measures among individuals with ALS was hypothesized. In addition, it was hypothesized that differential involvement of articulators would be detected using overall articulatory ROM measures.

Method Twenty-two speakers with dysarthria secondary to ALS and 22 typically aging speakers participated. Speech intelligibility and speaking rate were used as indices of severity. Movement range and overall articulatory working space area (convex hull) of the tongue, lower lip, and jaw were each measured by electromagnetic articulography while the speakers produced the Rainbow Passage.

Results Tongue convex hull size was significantly correlated with both indices of severity. A significant interaction between articulators and groups was observed. Individuals with severe dysarthria had reduced tongue convex hull size and exaggerated lower lip convex hull size. ROM in the anterior–posterior dimension showed a more notable differential involvement pattern than ROM in the superior–inferior dimension. Results in the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed group-specific ROM sensitivity.

Conclusions The findings indicate that tongue ROM is reduced in individuals with more severe dysarthria when estimated using a standardized paragraph containing all American English phonemes. The articulatory working space measure could be useful for estimating speech dysfunction in ALS. ROM of the tongue decreases, but ROM of the lower lip and jaw each increase in individuals with severe dysarthria. Differential involvement of the articulators in the anterior–posterior dimension needs to be further investigated.

Acknowledgments
The Social Science Research Institute/Children, Youth & Families Consortium Level I grant from the Pennsylvania State University (awarded to the first author) funded this research. We are grateful to the individuals with ALS who participated in this study. We thank the Penn State Hershey ALS Clinic and Research Center for supporting participant recruitment and Ana Daccach, Emily Dickey, and Elizabeth Rodriguez for assistance with data collection and analysis. Portions of the data were presented at the 2016 American Speech Language Hearing Association Convention.
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