Use of Textured Thin Liquids in Patients With Dysphagia Purpose The goals of this article are to explore the use of textured thin liquids for dysphagic patients who require thickened liquids and to illustrate their impact on hydration and patient satisfaction. Method A retrospective evaluation of textured thin liquids was completed using patient data looking at laboratory ... Research Note
Research Note  |   May 03, 2018
Use of Textured Thin Liquids in Patients With Dysphagia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa M. Howard
    Casa Colina Hospital and Centers for Healthcare, Pomona, CA
  • Paul M. Nissenson
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
  • Lauren Meeks
    Casa Colina Hospital and Centers for Healthcare, Pomona, CA
  • Emily R. Rosario
    Casa Colina Hospital and Centers for Healthcare, Pomona, CA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Emily R. Rosario: erosario@casacolina.org
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Research Notes
Research Note   |   May 03, 2018
Use of Textured Thin Liquids in Patients With Dysphagia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 827-835. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0140
History: Received August 24, 2016 , Revised February 27, 2017 , Accepted January 26, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 827-835. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0140
History: Received August 24, 2016; Revised February 27, 2017; Accepted January 26, 2018

Purpose The goals of this article are to explore the use of textured thin liquids for dysphagic patients who require thickened liquids and to illustrate their impact on hydration and patient satisfaction.

Method A retrospective evaluation of textured thin liquids was completed using patient data looking at laboratory values relevant to the detection of dehydration (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, sodium) and patient satisfaction (using a clinician-generated questionnaire) on different modified liquid textures. In addition, the viscosity for all liquids was tested using a rheometer.

Results Measurements show that the viscosity of the textured thin liquids examined in this pilot study are significantly lower than the viscosity of nectar-thick liquids and fall within the “thin” category as defined by the National Dysphagia Diet guidelines. Patients on honey- and nectar-thick liquids had laboratory values signifying dehydration, whereas those receiving the textured thin liquid consistency were within the normal range for all laboratory values. Importantly, when consuming textured thin liquids, patients reported significant improvement in their satisfaction related to their thirst.

Conclusion The results of this pilot study highlight the consequences of common thickened liquid dietary recommendations and of the potentially beneficial clinical application of textured thin liquids for patients with dysphagia as well as the need for future prospective research.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Dr. Loverso and the Casa Colina Board of Directors, the Inpatient Speech Department, and the Casa Colina Centers for Rehabilitation Foundation for supporting this research. We would also like to acknowledge Mario Toner, a Cal Poly Pomona Mechanical Engineering undergraduate student, for assisting with the viscosity measurement and thank the California State Polytechnic University Pomona for providing the equipment and resources for the viscosity measurement.
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