A Preliminary Examination of Concussion Knowledge by Collegiate Athletes and Non-Athletes Purpose Concussions affect various populations, including collegiate athletes and non-athletes. The purpose of this study was to compare collegiate varsity athletes, recreational athletes, and non-athletes' knowledge of concussion definition, symptoms, and support services available following injury. Preferred method of concussion education delivery was also examined. Method We surveyed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 03, 2018
A Preliminary Examination of Concussion Knowledge by Collegiate Athletes and Non-Athletes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly Knollman-Porter
    Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH
  • Jessica Brown
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Madelaine Flynn
    Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Kelly Knollman-Porter: knollmkk@miamioh.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: Kristie Spencer
    Editor: Kristie Spencer×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 03, 2018
A Preliminary Examination of Concussion Knowledge by Collegiate Athletes and Non-Athletes
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 778-795. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0108
History: Received July 18, 2017 , Revised November 4, 2017 , Accepted January 3, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 778-795. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0108
History: Received July 18, 2017; Revised November 4, 2017; Accepted January 3, 2018

Purpose Concussions affect various populations, including collegiate athletes and non-athletes. The purpose of this study was to compare collegiate varsity athletes, recreational athletes, and non-athletes' knowledge of concussion definition, symptoms, and support services available following injury. Preferred method of concussion education delivery was also examined.

Method We surveyed 306 current college students using an online survey system. The survey included free recall and forced-choice question formats. Quantitative analyses were used to analyze results and compare responses among groups.

Results Collegiate athletes and non-athletes demonstrate incomplete knowledge of concussion definition, related symptoms, and professionals involved in postinjury management. Varsity athletes rated self-knowledge of concussion parameters significantly higher than the other groups (p < .001), though few significant differences in actual knowledge levels were observed. Overall, respondents reported having the highest preference for concussion education delivered by medical professionals.

Conclusion Knowledge concerning concussion is incomplete in the collegiate population. Varsity athletes' exposure to formal education did not result in higher knowledge levels compared with other groups. Further examination of concussion educational delivery models' effect on change in concussion-related behavior in this population is warranted.

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