Grammatical Abilities in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Children With Normal Hearing Matched by Vocabulary Size Purpose This study sought to expand understanding of the impact of cochlear implantation on grammatical acquisition by comparing young children who have vocabularies of comparable size. Two research questions were investigated: (a) Do young cochlear implant (CI) recipients have grammatical skills comparable to those of children with normal hearing (NH) ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   April 05, 2018
Grammatical Abilities in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Children With Normal Hearing Matched by Vocabulary Size
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jongmin Jung
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • David J. Ertmer
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Jongmin Jung, who is now at the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus: jongmin.jung@osumc.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: Carol Miller
    Editor: Carol Miller×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   April 05, 2018
Grammatical Abilities in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Children With Normal Hearing Matched by Vocabulary Size
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0164
History: Received September 26, 2016 , Revised May 30, 2017 , Accepted December 17, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0164
History: Received September 26, 2016; Revised May 30, 2017; Accepted December 17, 2017

Purpose This study sought to expand understanding of the impact of cochlear implantation on grammatical acquisition by comparing young children who have vocabularies of comparable size. Two research questions were investigated: (a) Do young cochlear implant (CI) recipients have grammatical skills comparable to those of children with normal hearing (NH) matched by spoken vocabulary size? (b) Do these groups show associations between vocabulary size and grammatical measures?

Method The participants included 13 CI recipients at 24 months postactivation (chronological ages = 33–60 months; M = 44.62) and 13 children with NH between 27 and 30 months old (M = 20.69). The 2 groups were matched by their vocabulary size. Four grammatical outcomes were analyzed from the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory (Fenson, Marchman, Thal, Dale, & Reznick, 2007) and 20-min language samples: (a) grammatical complexity, (b) mean length of utterances, (c) tense marker total, and (d) productivity scores.

Results The 2 groups showed comparable grammatical skills across the 4 measures. Consistently significant associations between vocabulary size and grammatical outcomes were found in the CI group, with fewer associations in the NH group.

Conclusions The 2 groups showed similar grammatical abilities. The young CI recipients appeared to be following a typical pattern of linguistic development.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R01DC007863, David J. Ertmer, P. I.) and by grants from the Purdue Research Foundation, which were awarded to David J. Ertmer. The authors gratefully acknowledge the insightful feedback of George Hollich, Laurence Leonard, and Xin Luo in completing this project. The authors are also grateful to the parents and children who made this study possible. Sincere appreciation is offered to the staff of Child's Voice school (Wood Dale, IL), the St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (Chesterfield, MO), the St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (Indianapolis, IN), the Moog Center (Chesterfield, MO), and Ohio Valley Voice (Loveland, OH) for their indispensable assistance in recruiting participants and collecting data.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access