Maintenance of Improved Attitudes Toward Stuttering Purpose This study sought to determine the extent to which experimentally induced positive attitudes in high school students in a previous investigation were maintained 7 years later. Method Authors and assistants recruited 36 adults in their early 20s (Follow-up group) who, in high school, had witnessed either a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 03, 2018
Maintenance of Improved Attitudes Toward Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth O. St. Louis
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • Timothy W. Flynn
    EBS Healthcare, Alexandria, VA
  • Disclosure: Ken St. Louis is the copyright owner of the POSHA-S
    Disclosure: Ken St. Louis is the copyright owner of the POSHA-S ×
  • Correspondence to Kenneth O. St. Louis: ken.stlouis@mail.wvu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: Anthony DiLollo
    Editor: Anthony DiLollo×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 03, 2018
Maintenance of Improved Attitudes Toward Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 721-736. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0146
History: Received September 12, 2017 , Revised November 22, 2017 , Accepted November 30, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 721-736. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0146
History: Received September 12, 2017; Revised November 22, 2017; Accepted November 30, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study sought to determine the extent to which experimentally induced positive attitudes in high school students in a previous investigation were maintained 7 years later.

Method Authors and assistants recruited 36 adults in their early 20s (Follow-up group) who, in high school, had witnessed either a live oral talk by a person who stutters or a professionally made video on stuttering designed for teens followed by a short talk by the same speaker. The Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes–Stuttering was administered before and after the interventions in high school and 7 years later such that pre–post group comparisons were made. Previously, the Follow-up group had demonstrated highly positive changes in their attitudes after the interventions. In addition, a control group of 56 former high school students from the same state, who did not participate in the interventions, were recruited and compared to the Follow-up group.

Results The Follow-up group, which was found to be representative of the original high school cohort, held more positive Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes–Stuttering mean ratings than the Control group, although somewhat less positive than their previous postintervention ratings.

Conclusions The Follow-up group maintained many of the positive changes in their beliefs and self reactions regarding stuttering that were induced 7 years earlier after witnessing personal stories and facts about stuttering.

Acknowledgments
We are grateful for the valuable assistance of Tess J. Halverson in identifying members of the Follow-up group and local participants in the Control group. We also acknowledge the help of Madison M. Flick, Ashley M. Garrett, Allison M. Hatcher, Haley L. Glover, and Kayla B. Caudle in recruiting other West Virginia Control group participants.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access