The Effects of Parent Training on Vocabulary Scores of Young Children With Hearing Loss Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of short-term parent training on maternal use of language stimulation strategies and vocabulary scores in children with hearing loss. Method Six mother–child dyads participated in the multiple-baseline study. During baseline and maintenance, children engaged in a business-as-usual ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   March 27, 2018
The Effects of Parent Training on Vocabulary Scores of Young Children With Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emily Lund
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Emily Lund: e.lund@tcu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Nancy Brady
    Associate Editor: Nancy Brady×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   March 27, 2018
The Effects of Parent Training on Vocabulary Scores of Young Children With Hearing Loss
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0239
History: Received December 22, 2016 , Revised July 19, 2017 , Accepted December 19, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0239
History: Received December 22, 2016; Revised July 19, 2017; Accepted December 19, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of short-term parent training on maternal use of language stimulation strategies and vocabulary scores in children with hearing loss.

Method Six mother–child dyads participated in the multiple-baseline study. During baseline and maintenance, children engaged in a business-as-usual model of clinician-only therapy. During intervention, mothers and children participated in parent training focused on transparent labeling and linguistic mapping strategies. Parent strategy use was measured via weekly play-based probe assessments. Child vocabulary growth was measured via parent report.

Results A relation between parent training and use of transparent labeling was established for all mothers, and a relation between parent training and use of linguistic mapping was established for 3 of 6 mothers. Child vocabulary growth rate increased from baseline to intervention in 4 of 6 children.

Conclusions Short-term parent training can change parent behavior. However, parents may not maintain these skills without support. Further research is needed to characterize the extent to which short-term training can make long-term changes in parent and child outcomes.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the New Investigator Grant from the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, awarded to principal investigator Emily Lund.
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