Do Participants Report Any Undesired Effects in Ultrasound Speech Therapy? Purpose Ultrasound visual feedback of the tongue is increasingly used as a component of speech therapy in clinical research and practice. The purpose is to offer a preliminary summary of the nature of participant-reported undesired effects related to ultrasound visual feedback. Method Sixty-two participants across 3 sites (mean ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   March 15, 2018
Do Participants Report Any Undesired Effects in Ultrasound Speech Therapy?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan L. Preston
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Syracuse University, NY
  • Gabriela Holliman-Lopez
    Swarthmore College, PA
  • Megan C. Leece
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Syracuse University, NY
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jonathan Preston: jopresto@syr.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   March 15, 2018
Do Participants Report Any Undesired Effects in Ultrasound Speech Therapy?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0121
History: Received August 8, 2017 , Revised November 15, 2017 , Accepted December 11, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0121
History: Received August 8, 2017; Revised November 15, 2017; Accepted December 11, 2017

Purpose Ultrasound visual feedback of the tongue is increasingly used as a component of speech therapy in clinical research and practice. The purpose is to offer a preliminary summary of the nature of participant-reported undesired effects related to ultrasound visual feedback.

Method Sixty-two participants across 3 sites (mean age = 11.9 years) and 38 parents responded to a 2-item verbal questionnaire following 14–16 hr of treatment regarding any aspects of the treatment they did not like. Responses were thematically categorized.

Results The 62 participants provided 65 distinct responses, which were categorized as follows: 31% no concerns, 40% gel-related (e.g., cold, sticky), 21% positioning of the probe (e.g., uncomfortable, annoying), 3% chin hurting (qualified as being minor in nature), and 5% other (i.e., unrelated to the use of the ultrasound). Responses from all parents suggested no concerns about the use of ultrasound; however, 8% expressed concerns unrelated to ultrasound use (e.g., fatigue).

Conclusion These data inform clinicians and researchers about participant's experience and highlight the type of comments most likely to be encountered with ultrasound in speech therapy. Although the reported adverse effects can be considered minor, they should be weighed against the potential benefits of visual feedback in treatment.

Acknowledgments
Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health under Awards R15DC016426 (J. Preston, PI), R03DC012152 (J. Preston, PI), and R01DC013668 (D. Whalen, PI). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors thank Emily Phillips, Suzanne Boyce, Caroline Spencer, and Lindsay Rooney for assistance with data collection on this project.
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