Training Students to Evaluate Preterm Infant Feeding Safety Using a Video-Recorded Patient Simulation Approach Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if brief video-recorded patient simulation training increased students' ability to assess feeding skills in preterm infants. Method Baccalaureate-level nursing students (N = 52) and graduate-level speech-language pathology students (N = 42) were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: didactic ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 03, 2018
Training Students to Evaluate Preterm Infant Feeding Safety Using a Video-Recorded Patient Simulation Approach
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Neina F. Ferguson
    Tubes 2 Tables, Inc.: Feeding and Swallowing Therapies, Pensacola, FL
  • Julie M. Estis
    University of South Alabama
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Neina F. Ferguson: nfferg@gmail.com
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 03, 2018
Training Students to Evaluate Preterm Infant Feeding Safety Using a Video-Recorded Patient Simulation Approach
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 566-573. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0107
History: Received June 16, 2016 , Revised January 16, 2017 , Accepted October 23, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 566-573. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0107
History: Received June 16, 2016; Revised January 16, 2017; Accepted October 23, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if brief video-recorded patient simulation training increased students' ability to assess feeding skills in preterm infants.

Method Baccalaureate-level nursing students (N = 52) and graduate-level speech-language pathology students (N = 42) were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: didactic training (N = 51) or didactic training plus video simulation (N = 43). Outcome measures included knowledge test scores, calculated clinical judgment scores, and clinical marker documentation accuracy.

Results Students' knowledge increased as the result of training, without differences in test scores between the 2 types of training. Students who received video simulation training interpreted simulated feeding behaviors of preterm infants more accurately than students who received didactic training. Infant distress signs were also documented with higher accuracy for students who received video simulation training. After training and regardless of method, participants correctly attributed distress behaviors during bottle-feeding to increased risk for feeding difficulty.

Conclusions In the current educational environment, training opportunities with high-risk preterm infants are constrained by access to health care settings specializing in care for this population and availability of clinical supervisors with expertise in this area of practice. Patient simulators are expensive; however, video simulation offers inexpensive opportunities for students to effectively gain knowledge and skills for assessing feeding in preterm infants. With video simulation, students effectively apply principles of preterm infant feeding to cases and practice critical thinking skills before entering related clinical practicum placements.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to recognize and thank students from Old Dominion University students and the University of South Alabama for participating in this study. The first author would like to thank Julie Estis for her continuous and unwavering support. In addition, the authors thank the committee members, Paul Dagenais, James Van Haneghan, Heather Hall, and Cheryl Robinson, for their distinct perspectives that enhanced the quality of this project. Last, the authors would like to recognize a long-time mentor, Anastasia Raymer at Old Dominion University, who has offered 20 years of clinical guidance and personal advice and who completed edits on an earlier version of this clinical focus article.
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