Response Time Inconsistencies in Object and Action Naming in Anomic Aphasia Purpose The effect of repeated naming on both object and action picture naming in individuals with anomic aphasia is explored. We asked whether repeatedly naming the same items leads to improved accuracy and reduced response latency. Method Ten individuals with anomic aphasia and 6 healthy adults, 3 young ... Research Note
Research Note  |   March 01, 2018
Response Time Inconsistencies in Object and Action Naming in Anomic Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth E. Galletta
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, New York University Langone Health, New York
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York
    Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Graduate Center, City University of New York, Bronx
  • Mira Goral
    Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Graduate Center, City University of New York, Bronx
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Lehman College, City University of New York, New York
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Elizabeth E. Galletta: elizabeth.galletta@gmail.com
  • Editor: Margaret Blake
    Editor: Margaret Blake×
  • Associate Editor: JoAnn Silkes
    Associate Editor: JoAnn Silkes×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Research Notes
Research Note   |   March 01, 2018
Response Time Inconsistencies in Object and Action Naming in Anomic Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 477-484. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0168
History: Received October 3, 2016 , Revised February 2, 2017 , Accepted October 10, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 477-484. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0168
History: Received October 3, 2016; Revised February 2, 2017; Accepted October 10, 2017

Purpose The effect of repeated naming on both object and action picture naming in individuals with anomic aphasia is explored. We asked whether repeatedly naming the same items leads to improved accuracy and reduced response latency.

Method Ten individuals with anomic aphasia and 6 healthy adults, 3 young and 3 old, named a set of 27 object pictures and a set of 27 action pictures presented 1 at a time on a computer screen. We examined accuracy and response times (RTs) across the 2 blocks of 10 repeated trials.

Results Results demonstrated higher accuracy and faster RTs for object than for action naming for all participants, with lower accuracy rates and slower RTs for the people with aphasia (PWA) compared with the healthy individuals, and diverging patterns of change across trials. Unlike the healthy participants, whose RTs decreased across trials, PWA continued to demonstrate variability in response latencies across the trials.

Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest that measuring RT may be useful in characterizing retrieval difficulty in anomic aphasia and that the retrieval processes in PWA, even in those who experience mild anomia, may be less efficient or different from those processes in neurologically healthy individuals.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institutes of Health Grant DC 009792, awarded to Mira Goral. The authors would like to thank the people with aphasia and the participants with no brain damage who volunteered to participate in this study. The authors would also like to thank May Sofi, Amy Vogel-Eyny, and Olga Iukalo for help with the reaction time measurements and data entry, and Katy Borodkin for developing the naming tests.
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