What Matters in Semantic Feature Analysis: Practice-Related Predictors of Treatment Response in Aphasia Purpose This study investigated the predictive value of practice-related variables—number of treatment trials delivered, total treatment time, average number of trials per hour, and average number of participant-generated features per trial—in response to semantic feature analysis (SFA) treatment. Method SFA was administered to 17 participants with chronic aphasia ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2018
What Matters in Semantic Feature Analysis: Practice-Related Predictors of Treatment Response in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle L. Gravier
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • Michael W. Dickey
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • William D. Hula
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
    Audiology and Speech Pathology Service, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • William S. Evans
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • Rebecca L. Owens
    Audiology and Speech Pathology Service, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • Ronda L. Winans-Mitrik
    Audiology and Speech Pathology Service, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • Patrick J. Doyle
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
    Audiology and Speech Pathology Service, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Michelle L. Gravier: michelle.gravier@va.gov
  • Editor: Margaret Blake
    Editor: Margaret Blake×
  • Associate Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Associate Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2018
What Matters in Semantic Feature Analysis: Practice-Related Predictors of Treatment Response in Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 438-453. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0196
History: Received October 30, 2016 , Revised April 17, 2017 , Accepted May 26, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 438-453. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0196
History: Received October 30, 2016; Revised April 17, 2017; Accepted May 26, 2017

Purpose This study investigated the predictive value of practice-related variables—number of treatment trials delivered, total treatment time, average number of trials per hour, and average number of participant-generated features per trial—in response to semantic feature analysis (SFA) treatment.

Method SFA was administered to 17 participants with chronic aphasia daily for 4 weeks. Individualized treatment and semantically related probe lists were generated from items that participants were unable to name consistently during baseline testing. Treatment was administered to each list sequentially in a multiple-baseline design. Naming accuracy for treated and untreated items was obtained at study entry, exit, and 1-month follow-up.

Results Item-level naming accuracy was analyzed using logistic mixed-effect regression models. The average number of features generated per trial positively predicted naming accuracy for both treated and untreated items, at exit and follow-up. In contrast, total treatment time and average trials per hour did not significantly predict treatment response. The predictive effect of number of treatment trials on naming accuracy trended toward significance at exit, although this relationship held for treated items only.

Conclusions These results suggest that the number of patient-generated features may be more strongly associated with SFA-related naming outcomes, particularly generalization and maintenance, than other practice-related variables.

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5734113

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Award I01RX000832 to Michael W. Dickey and Patrick J. Doyle and the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. The contents of this article do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs of the U.S. Government. The authors would also like to acknowledge the contribution of the research participants and the Program for Intensive Residential Aphasia Treatment and Education clinical and research staff, including early contributions to the project by Brooke Swoyer and Beth Friedman.
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