The Relationship Between Confrontation Naming and Story Gist Production in Aphasia Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between picture naming performance and the ability to communicate the gist, or essential elements, of a story. We also sought to determine if this relationship varied according to Western Aphasia Battery–Revised (WAB-R; Kertesz, 2007) aphasia subtype. Method ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2018
The Relationship Between Confrontation Naming and Story Gist Production in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica D. Richardson
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Sarah Grace Hudspeth Dalton
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Davida Fromm
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Margaret Forbes
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Audrey Holland
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Brian MacWhinney
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jessica D. Richardson: jdrichardson@unm.edu
  • Editor: Margaret Blake
    Editor: Margaret Blake×
  • Associate Editor: Gerasimos Fergadiotis
    Associate Editor: Gerasimos Fergadiotis×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2018
The Relationship Between Confrontation Naming and Story Gist Production in Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 406-422. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0211
History: Received November 1, 2016 , Revised April 18, 2017 , Accepted October 6, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 406-422. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0211
History: Received November 1, 2016; Revised April 18, 2017; Accepted October 6, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between picture naming performance and the ability to communicate the gist, or essential elements, of a story. We also sought to determine if this relationship varied according to Western Aphasia Battery–Revised (WAB-R; Kertesz, 2007) aphasia subtype.

Method Demographic information, test scores, and transcripts of 258 individuals with aphasia completing 3 narrative tasks were retrieved from the AphasiaBank database. Narratives were subjected to a main concept analysis to determine gist production. A correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between naming scores and main concept production for the whole group of persons with aphasia and for WAB-R subtypes separately.

Results We found strong correlations between naming test scores and narrative gist production for the large sample of persons with aphasia. However, the strength of the correlations varied by WAB-R subtype.

Conclusions Picture naming may accurately predict gist production for individuals with Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia, but not for other WAB-R subtypes. Given the current reprioritization of outcome measurement, picture naming may not be an appropriate surrogate measure for functional communication for all persons with aphasia.

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5851848

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by NIH NIGMS P20GM109089, awarded to Jessica D. Richardson.
The authors would like to thank AphasiaBank developers and contributors and graduate students at the University of New Mexico for their valuable contribution to this project. They would like to extend their gratitude also to the Chapman Foundation, which supported their first discourse project that eventually led to additional projects such as this.
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