Attentive Reading With Constrained Summarization Adapted to Address Written Discourse in People With Mild Aphasia Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the preliminary efficacy of Attentive Reading and Constrained Summarization–Written (ARCS-W) in people with mild aphasia. ARCS-W adapts an existing treatment, ARCS (Rogalski & Edmonds, 2008), to address discourse level writing in mild aphasia. ARCS-W focuses on the cognitive and linguistic skills ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2018
Attentive Reading With Constrained Summarization Adapted to Address Written Discourse in People With Mild Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica A. Obermeyer
    Communication Sciences & Disorders in the Department of Biobehavioral Sciences, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Lisa A. Edmonds
    Communication Sciences & Disorders in the Department of Biobehavioral Sciences, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Jessica A. Obermeyer: jao2158@tc.columbia.edu
  • Editor: Margaret Blake
    Editor: Margaret Blake×
  • Associate Editor: Leora Cherney
    Associate Editor: Leora Cherney×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2018
Attentive Reading With Constrained Summarization Adapted to Address Written Discourse in People With Mild Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 392-405. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0200
History: Received October 31, 2016 , Revised March 1, 2017 , Accepted September 7, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 392-405. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0200
History: Received October 31, 2016; Revised March 1, 2017; Accepted September 7, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the preliminary efficacy of Attentive Reading and Constrained Summarization–Written (ARCS-W) in people with mild aphasia. ARCS-W adapts an existing treatment, ARCS (Rogalski & Edmonds, 2008), to address discourse level writing in mild aphasia. ARCS-W focuses on the cognitive and linguistic skills required for discourse production.

Method This study was a within-subject pre–postdesign. Three people with mild aphasia participated. ARCS-W integrates attentive reading or listening with constrained summarization of discourse level material in spoken and written modalities. Outcomes included macro- (main concepts) and microlinguistic (correct information units, complete utterances) discourse measures, confrontation naming, aphasia severity, and functional communication.

Results All 3 participants demonstrated some generalization to untrained spoken and written discourse at the word, sentence, and text levels. Reduced aphasia severity and/or increased functional communication and confrontation naming were also observed in some participants.

Conclusions The findings of this study provide preliminary evidence of the efficacy of ARCS-W to improve spoken and written discourse in mild aphasia. Different generalization patterns suggest different mechanisms of improvement. Further research and replication are required to better understand how ARCS-W can impact discourse abilities.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to acknowledge Lee Silverman Voice Treatment Global for the grant funding for this study. This study was supported by a grant from the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment Foundation Global, which was awarded to Jessica A. Obermeyer. The authors would also like to thank the participants who dedicated so much time to this project and the Aphasia Rehabilitation and Bilingualism Research Lab at Teachers College, Columbia University, for the support of its wonderful members, specifically Heather Swanson, Jaquelyn Franquez, and Danielle Eskridge.
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