Links Between Short-Term Memory and Word Retrieval in Aphasia Purpose This study explored the relationship between anomia and verbal short-term memory (STM) in the context of an interactive activation language processing model. Method Twenty-four individuals with aphasia and reduced STM spans (i.e., impaired immediate serial recall of words) completed a picture-naming task and a word pair repetition ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2018
Links Between Short-Term Memory and Word Retrieval in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Irene Minkina
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Nadine Martin
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Kristie A. Spencer
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Diane L. Kendall
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Puget Sound, University of Washington, Seattle
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Irene Minkina: iminkina@temple.edu
  • Editor: Margaret Blake
    Editor: Margaret Blake×
  • Associate Editor: Jacqueline Laures-Gore
    Associate Editor: Jacqueline Laures-Gore×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2018
Links Between Short-Term Memory and Word Retrieval in Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 379-391. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0194
History: Received October 28, 2016 , Revised March 9, 2017 , Accepted March 30, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 379-391. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0194
History: Received October 28, 2016; Revised March 9, 2017; Accepted March 30, 2017

Purpose This study explored the relationship between anomia and verbal short-term memory (STM) in the context of an interactive activation language processing model.

Method Twenty-four individuals with aphasia and reduced STM spans (i.e., impaired immediate serial recall of words) completed a picture-naming task and a word pair repetition task (a measure of verbal STM). Correlations between verbal STM and word retrieval errors made on the picture-naming task were examined.

Results A significant positive correlation between naming accuracy and verbal span length was found. More intricate verbal STM analyses examined the relationship between picture-naming error types (i.e., semantic vs. phonological) and 2 measures of verbal STM: (a) location of errors on the word pair repetition task and (b) imageability and frequency effects on the word pair repetition task. Results indicated that, as phonological word retrieval errors (relative to semantic) increase, bias toward correct repetition of high-imageability words increases.

Conclusions Results suggest that word retrieval and verbal STM tasks likely rely on a partially shared temporary linguistic activation process.

Acknowledgments
The first author was supported by an NIDCD Institutional Training Grant under Grant T32000033 during the completion of this research. Research reported in this publication was also supported by the NIDCD of the National Institutes of Health under Award number R01DC013196 (P. I.: Nadine Martin). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
This study was conducted at the University of Washington Aphasia Research Laboratory. We would like to thank all of the participants and their families for their time and effort.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access