Language Changes Following Combined Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Treatment Purpose Combined Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Treatment (CAAST) is a newly developed treatment shown to increase production of accurate content in narrative discourse for persons with aphasia and apraxia of speech. The purpose of this post hoc study was to further describe lexical and morphosyntactic changes associated with changes ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2018
Language Changes Following Combined Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa D. Bunker
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Sandra Wright
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
  • Julie L. Wambaugh
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lisa D. Bunker: lisa.bunker@utah.edu
  • Editor: Margaret Blake
    Editor: Margaret Blake×
  • Associate Editor: Katarina Haley
    Associate Editor: Katarina Haley×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2018
Language Changes Following Combined Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Treatment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 323-335. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0193
History: Received October 28, 2016 , Revised March 27, 2017 , Accepted December 14, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 323-335. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0193
History: Received October 28, 2016; Revised March 27, 2017; Accepted December 14, 2017

Purpose Combined Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Treatment (CAAST) is a newly developed treatment shown to increase production of accurate content in narrative discourse for persons with aphasia and apraxia of speech. The purpose of this post hoc study was to further describe lexical and morphosyntactic changes associated with changes in content production.

Method Existing probe data from 8 persons with aphasia who had completed CAAST were used to complete analyses of morphosyntactic production, lexical diversity, and novelty of content. Language analyses were completed using discourse samples obtained at numerous pretreatment and posttreatment intervals.

Results All participants demonstrated gains in morphosyntactic language output for treated items, which extended to untreated sets for 7 participants. All 8 increased in production of novel content. Lexical diversity increases were evident for most participants. Although there were some similarities in language changes, there was substantial variability across response profiles.

Conclusion CAAST, previously associated with positive treatment effects for production of accurate content, also appears to facilitate acquisition and generalization of morphosyntactic complexity, lexical diversity, and novelty of content for individuals with nonfluent aphasia. Further investigation is needed to determine causality and appropriate clinical application.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5912530

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Small Projects in Rehabilitation Research Grant RX001365-0 and Research Career Scientist Award 23727 from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service (awarded to Julie L. Wambaugh). The contents do not represent the views of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States government (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01979159).
Thanks are extended to Christina Nessler, Catharine Delong, Dallin Bailey, Jessica Brunsvold, and Nicole Dingus for assistance with this project and to the reviewers for their helpful comments to improve this article.
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