Considerations for the Use of Neuroimaging Technologies for Predicting Recovery of Speech and Language in Aphasia Purpose The number of research articles aimed at identifying neuroimaging biomarkers for predicting recovery from aphasia continues to grow. Although the clinical use of these biomarkers to determine prognosis has been proposed, there has been little discussion of how this would be accomplished. This is an important issue because the ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   March 01, 2018
Considerations for the Use of Neuroimaging Technologies for Predicting Recovery of Speech and Language in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda I. Shuster
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Linda I. Shuster: linda.shuster@wmich.edu
  • Editor: Margaret Blake
    Editor: Margaret Blake×
  • Associate Editor: Janet Patterson
    Associate Editor: Janet Patterson×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 46th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   March 01, 2018
Considerations for the Use of Neuroimaging Technologies for Predicting Recovery of Speech and Language in Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 291-305. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0180
History: Received October 25, 2016 , Revised June 2, 2017 , Accepted January 16, 2018
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 291-305. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0180
History: Received October 25, 2016; Revised June 2, 2017; Accepted January 16, 2018

Purpose The number of research articles aimed at identifying neuroimaging biomarkers for predicting recovery from aphasia continues to grow. Although the clinical use of these biomarkers to determine prognosis has been proposed, there has been little discussion of how this would be accomplished. This is an important issue because the best translational science occurs when translation is considered early in the research process. The purpose of this clinical focus article is to present a framework to guide the discussion of how neuroimaging biomarkers for recovery from aphasia could be implemented clinically.

Method The genomics literature reveals that implementing genetic testing in the real-world poses both opportunities and challenges. There is much similarity between these opportunities and challenges and those related to implementing neuroimaging testing to predict recovery in aphasia. Therefore, the Center for Disease Control's model list of questions aimed at guiding the review of genetic testing has been adapted to guide the discussion of using neuroimaging biomarkers as predictors of recovery in aphasia.

Conclusion The adapted model list presented here is a first and useful step toward initiating a discussion of how neuroimaging biomarkers of recovery could be employed clinically to provide improved quality of care for individuals with aphasia.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access