Language Assessment for Children With a Range of Neurodevelopmental Disorders Across Four Languages in South Africa Purpose The purpose of this study is (a) to examine the applicability of a culturally and linguistically adapted measure to assess the receptive and expressive language skills of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) in South Africa and then (b) to explore the contributions of 2 additional language measures. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 03, 2018
Language Assessment for Children With a Range of Neurodevelopmental Disorders Across Four Languages in South Africa
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • MaryAnn Romski
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Juan Bornman
    University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Rose A. Sevcik
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Kerstin Tönsing
    University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Andrea Barton-Hulsey
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Refilwe Morwane
    University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Ani Whitmore
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Robyn White
    University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to MaryAnn Romski: mromski@gsu.edu
  • Andrea Barton-Hulsey is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    Andrea Barton-Hulsey is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.×
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: Cynthia Cress
    Editor: Cynthia Cress×
Article Information
Development / International & Global / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 03, 2018
Language Assessment for Children With a Range of Neurodevelopmental Disorders Across Four Languages in South Africa
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 602-615. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0035
History: Received March 19, 2017 , Revised August 24, 2017 , Accepted September 22, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2018, Vol. 27, 602-615. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0035
History: Received March 19, 2017; Revised August 24, 2017; Accepted September 22, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The purpose of this study is (a) to examine the applicability of a culturally and linguistically adapted measure to assess the receptive and expressive language skills of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) in South Africa and then (b) to explore the contributions of 2 additional language measures.

Method In Part 1, 100 children with NDD who spoke Afrikaans, isiZulu, Setswana, or South African English were assessed on the culturally and linguistically adapted Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL). Clinicians independently rated the children's language skills on a 3-point scale. In Part 2, the final 20 children to be recruited participated in a caregiver-led interaction, after which the caregiver completed a rating scale about their perceptions of their children's language.

Results Performance on the MSEL was consistent with clinician-rated child language skills. The 2 additional measures confirmed and enriched the description of the child's performance on the MSEL.

Conclusions The translated MSEL and the supplemental measures successfully characterize the language profiles and related skills in children with NDD in multilingual South Africa. Together, these assessment tools can serve a valuable function in guiding the choice of intervention and also may serve as a way to monitor progress.

Acknowledgments
Research reported in the article was supported by the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center grant number TW-008999 to MaryAnn Romski. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors thank the children, caregivers, teachers, and clinicians who participated in this study. They also thank Marika King for her assistance in double-checking the data.
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