Effects of Familiarization on Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech in Older Adults With and Without Hearing Loss Purpose Familiarization tasks offer a promising platform for listener-targeted remediation of intelligibility disorders associated with dysarthria. To date, the body of work demonstrating improved understanding of dysarthric speech following a familiarization experience has been carried out on younger adults. The primary purpose of the present study was to examine the ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   January 05, 2018
Effects of Familiarization on Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech in Older Adults With and Without Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kaitlin L. Lansford
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Stephani Luhrsen
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Erin M. Ingvalson
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Stephanie A. Borrie
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Kaitlin L. Lansford: klansford@fsu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: Jeannette Hoit
    Editor: Jeannette Hoit×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   January 05, 2018
Effects of Familiarization on Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech in Older Adults With and Without Hearing Loss
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0090
History: Received June 14, 2017 , Revised July 17, 2017 , Accepted July 25, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0090
History: Received June 14, 2017; Revised July 17, 2017; Accepted July 25, 2017

Purpose Familiarization tasks offer a promising platform for listener-targeted remediation of intelligibility disorders associated with dysarthria. To date, the body of work demonstrating improved understanding of dysarthric speech following a familiarization experience has been carried out on younger adults. The primary purpose of the present study was to examine the intelligibility effects of familiarization in older adults.

Method Nineteen older adults, with and without hearing loss, completed a familiarization protocol consisting of three phases: pretest, familiarization, and posttest. The older adults' initial intelligibility and intelligibility improvement scores were compared with previously reported data collected from 50 younger adults (Borrie, Lansford, & Barrett, 2017a).

Results Relative to younger adults, initial intelligibility scores were significantly lower for older adults, although additional analysis revealed that the difference was limited to older adults with hearing loss. Key, however, is that irrespective of hearing status, the older and younger adults achieved comparable intelligibility improvement following familiarization (gain of roughly 20 percentage points).

Conclusion This study extends previous findings of improved intelligibility of dysarthria following familiarization to a group of listeners who are critical to consider in listener-targeted remediation, namely, aging caregivers and/or spouses of individuals with dysarthria.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R21 DC 016084, awarded to Stephanie A. Borrie. We gratefully acknowledge Paul Vicioso Osoria, research assistant in the Human Interaction Laboratory at Utah State University, for development of the web-based listener-application application for this study and Tyson Barret from the Utah State University Statistical Consulting Studio for figure creation. In addition, we extend our gratitude to Julie Liss at Arizona State University for the continued use of her extensive speech sample database.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access