Articulatory Kinematic Characteristics Across the Dysarthria Severity Spectrum in Individuals With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Purpose The current study investigated whether articulatory kinematic patterns can be extrapolated across the spectrum of dysarthria severity in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Method Temporal and spatial articulatory kinematic data were collected using electromagnetic articulography from 14 individuals with dysarthria secondary to ALS and 6 typically ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   December 06, 2017
Articulatory Kinematic Characteristics Across the Dysarthria Severity Spectrum in Individuals With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jimin Lee
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Michael Bell
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Zachary Simmons
    Department of Neurology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey
    Department of Humanities, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey
    The Penn State Hershey ALS Clinic and Research Center, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jimin Lee: JXL91@psu.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 06, 2017
Articulatory Kinematic Characteristics Across the Dysarthria Severity Spectrum in Individuals With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0230
History: Received November 22, 2016 , Revised April 16, 2017 , Accepted July 19, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0230
History: Received November 22, 2016; Revised April 16, 2017; Accepted July 19, 2017

Purpose The current study investigated whether articulatory kinematic patterns can be extrapolated across the spectrum of dysarthria severity in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Method Temporal and spatial articulatory kinematic data were collected using electromagnetic articulography from 14 individuals with dysarthria secondary to ALS and 6 typically aging speakers. Speech intelligibility and speaking rate were used as indices of severity.

Results Temporal measures (duration, speed of articulators) were significantly correlated with both indices of severity. In speakers with dysarthria, spatial measures were not correlated with severity except in 3 measures: tongue movement displacement was more reduced in the anterior–posterior dimension; jaw movement distance was greater in the inferior–superior dimension; jaw convex hull area was larger in speakers with slower speaking rates. Visual inspection of movement trajectories revealed that overall spatial kinematic characteristics in speakers with severe dysarthria differed qualitatively from those in speakers with mild or moderate dysarthria. Unlike speakers with dysarthria, typically aging speakers displayed variable tongue movement and minimal jaw movement.

Conclusions The current study revealed that spatial articulatory characteristics, unlike temporal characteristics, showed a complicated pattern across the severity spectrum. The findings suggest that articulatory characteristics in speakers with severe dysarthria cannot simply be extrapolated from those in speakers with mild-to-moderate dysarthria secondary to ALS.

Acknowledgments
The Social Science Research Institute/Children, Youth & Families Consortium Level I grant from The Pennsylvania State University funded this research (awarded to Jimin Lee). We are grateful to the patients who participated in this study. We thank Olivia Proper, Ana Daccach, Hayley Buxton, and Lydia Polley for assistance with data collection and analysis. Portions of these data were presented at the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech and in the graduate research paper of Michael Bell.
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