Early Development of Emotional Competence (EDEC) Assessment Tool for Children With Complex Communication Needs: Development and Evidence Purpose This article introduces and provides initial data supporting “The Early Development of Emotional Competence (EDEC): A tool for children with complex communication needs (CCNs).” The EDEC was developed to raise awareness about the relation of language and emotional competence and to maximize the likelihood that intervention includes language to ... Clinical Focus
Newly Published
Clinical Focus  |   December 06, 2017
Early Development of Emotional Competence (EDEC) Assessment Tool for Children With Complex Communication Needs: Development and Evidence
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ji Young Na
    Rehabilitation Specialized Head Quarter, The Korea Nazarene University, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea
  • Krista Wilkinson
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, State College
  • Jiali Liang
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, State College
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ji Young Na: jiyoungna2015@gmail.com
  • Editor: Joe Reichle
    Editor: Joe Reichle×
  • Associate Editor: Patricia Prelock
    Associate Editor: Patricia Prelock×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Newly Published / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   December 06, 2017
Early Development of Emotional Competence (EDEC) Assessment Tool for Children With Complex Communication Needs: Development and Evidence
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0058
History: Received April 16, 2016 , Revised October 10, 2016 , Accepted April 12, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0058
History: Received April 16, 2016; Revised October 10, 2016; Accepted April 12, 2017

Purpose This article introduces and provides initial data supporting “The Early Development of Emotional Competence (EDEC): A tool for children with complex communication needs (CCNs).” The EDEC was developed to raise awareness about the relation of language and emotional competence and to maximize the likelihood that intervention includes language to discuss emotions in ways that are consistent with the values and goals of the family.

Method First, the theoretical and clinical foundations of the EDEC development were discussed. Then, a description of preferred translation practices was provided, with examples of Korean and Mandarin Chinese translations. Finally, initial data from a pilot study with two sociocultural communities (i.e., 10 American and 10 Korean mothers of children developing typically) were presented to demonstrate the potential of the tool.

Results The pilot test offered preliminary support for the sensitivity of the EDEC. The tool solicited responses reflecting cultural differences between American and Korean mothers' perception of a child's emotional skills and mother-child conversation about emotions as predicted based on many cross-cultural studies in emotion.

Conclusions The information elicited from the EDEC shows promise for enabling culturally natural conversation about emotions with appropriate vocabulary and phrases in their augmentative and alternative communication systems.

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5643076

Acknowledgments
The description of the development of the tool was part of a Master's Project by Emily Townsend. This research project is funded in part by the U.S. Department of Education under Grant H325D110008 (awarded to the Penn State AAC program). Parts of this project were presented at the Annual American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Conference (2014). The authors would like to thank Sarah Blackstone, Dale Epstein, Gabriela Rangel, Jennifer J. Thistle, Jacob Feldman, Emily Hobbs, and Pamela Cole for their suggestions and assistance throughout the development of this article, as well as the EPC/P2C research community at the Pennsylvania State University.
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