Comparing Traditional Service Delivery and Telepractice for Speech Sound Production Using a Functional Outcome Measure Purpose Using American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS) Functional Communication Measure (FCM) as a common metric, this investigation compared traditional service delivery and telepractice service delivery for children receiving therapy for the NOMS diagnostic category of “speech sound production.” Method De-identified cases were secured from ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   November 29, 2017
Comparing Traditional Service Delivery and Telepractice for Speech Sound Production Using a Functional Outcome Measure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathy Coufal
    Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska at Omaha
  • Douglas Parham
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Wichita State University, KS
  • Melissa Jakubowitz
    LTHPFXR Consulting, Lafayette, CA
  • Cassandra Howell
    Speech-Language Pathology, El Paso County District 8, Fountain, CO
  • Jared Reyes
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Wichita State University, KS
  • Disclosure: Melissa Jakubowitz worked for the telepractice company cited in the article from January 2010 until September 2015. She was employed by this company during the period of data collection. Ms. Jakubowitz headed the clinical department and began utilizing NOMs data in 2011. This author will not receive any financial benefit from the publication of this article. The other coauthors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: Melissa Jakubowitz worked for the telepractice company cited in the article from January 2010 until September 2015. She was employed by this company during the period of data collection. Ms. Jakubowitz headed the clinical department and began utilizing NOMs data in 2011. This author will not receive any financial benefit from the publication of this article. The other coauthors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kathy Coufal: kcoufal@unomaha.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley
    Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   November 29, 2017
Comparing Traditional Service Delivery and Telepractice for Speech Sound Production Using a Functional Outcome Measure
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0070
History: Received May 3, 2016 , Revised January 30, 2017 , Accepted July 13, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0070
History: Received May 3, 2016; Revised January 30, 2017; Accepted July 13, 2017

Purpose Using American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS) Functional Communication Measure (FCM) as a common metric, this investigation compared traditional service delivery and telepractice service delivery for children receiving therapy for the NOMS diagnostic category of “speech sound production.”

Method De-identified cases were secured from ASHA's NOMS database and a proprietary database from a private e-learning provider. Cases were included if they met 3 criteria: (a) children received treatment exclusively for speech sound production, (b) they were between 6.0 and 9.5 years old, and (c) they received therapy lasting between 4 and 9 months. A total of 1,331 ASHA NOMS cases and 428 telepractice cases were included. The 2 groups were matched by initial FCM scores. Mann–Whitney U tests were completed to compare differences in the median change scores (the difference between the initial and final FCM scores) between the 2 groups.

Results There were no significant differences in the median change scores between the traditional group and the telepractice group.

Conclusions These results suggest comparable treatment outcomes between traditional service delivery and telepractice for treatment of children exhibiting speech sound disorders. The findings provide support for the use of telepractice for school-age children.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and PresenceLearning for their support of this investigation.
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