The Impact of Expiratory Muscle Strength Training on Speech Breathing in Individuals With Parkinson's Disease: A Preliminary Study Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of expiratory muscle strength training on speech breathing and functional speech outcomes in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method Twelve individuals with PD were seen once a week for 8 weeks: 4 pretraining (baseline) sessions followed by ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 08, 2017
The Impact of Expiratory Muscle Strength Training on Speech Breathing in Individuals With Parkinson's Disease: A Preliminary Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meghan Darling-White
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jessica E. Huber
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Meghan Darling-White and Jessica E. Huber contributed equally to this article.
    Meghan Darling-White and Jessica E. Huber contributed equally to this article.×
  • Correspondence to Meghan Darling-White: darlingwhite@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer
    Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 08, 2017
The Impact of Expiratory Muscle Strength Training on Speech Breathing in Individuals With Parkinson's Disease: A Preliminary Study
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2017, Vol. 26, 1159-1166. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0132
History: Received August 8, 2016 , Revised March 23, 2017 , Accepted May 16, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2017, Vol. 26, 1159-1166. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0132
History: Received August 8, 2016; Revised March 23, 2017; Accepted May 16, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of expiratory muscle strength training on speech breathing and functional speech outcomes in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD).

Method Twelve individuals with PD were seen once a week for 8 weeks: 4 pretraining (baseline) sessions followed by a 4-week training period. Posttraining data were collected at the end of the 4th week of training. Maximum expiratory pressure, an indicator of expiratory muscle strength, and lung volume at speech initiation were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcomes included lung volume at speech termination, lung volume excursion, utterance length, and vocal intensity. Data were collected during a spontaneous speech sample. Individual effect sizes > 1 were considered significant.

Results Maximum expiratory pressure increased in a majority of participants after training. Training resulted in 2 main respiratory patterns: increasing or decreasing lung volume initiation. Lung volume termination and excursion, utterance length, and vocal loudness were not consistently altered by training.

Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests that the direct physiologic intervention of the respiratory system via expiratory muscle strength training improves speech breathing in individuals with PD, with participants using more typical lung volumes for speech following treatment.

Acknowledgments
Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health under grant F31DC012233-02, awarded to Meghan Darling-White, and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under grants T32HD007489, awarded to Marsha Mailick, and P30HD003352, awarded to the Waisman Center at University of Wisconsin–Madison. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
We would like to thank Christine Sapienza for acting as a consultant to ensure proper implementation of the expiratory muscle strength training program. Thank you to Lisa Goffman, Jeff Haddad, and Elaine Francis for their advice and expertise throughout this project. Thank you to Sandy Snyder for her help with data collection and management of data measurement. Thank you to Nicole Herndon, Ashley Guss, Holly Nelson, Kate Steele, and Heather Bolan for assistance with data collection and measurement.
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