The Frequency and Nature of Communication Between School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists and Caregivers of Children With Language Impairment Purpose The present study investigates the extent to which school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) communicate with the caregivers of children with language impairment and the factors that are significantly associated with frequent communication. In addition, this study investigates the extent to which frequent SLP–caregiver communication is associated with change in language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 08, 2017
The Frequency and Nature of Communication Between School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists and Caregivers of Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sherine R. Tambyraja
    Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Mary Beth Schmitt
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock
  • Laura M. Justice
    Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Sherine R. Tambyraja: tambyraja.1@osu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Wolter
    Associate Editor: Julie Wolter×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 08, 2017
The Frequency and Nature of Communication Between School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists and Caregivers of Children With Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2017, Vol. 26, 1193-1201. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0235
History: Received December 6, 2016 , Revised May 30, 2017 , Accepted June 26, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2017, Vol. 26, 1193-1201. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0235
History: Received December 6, 2016; Revised May 30, 2017; Accepted June 26, 2017

Purpose The present study investigates the extent to which school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) communicate with the caregivers of children with language impairment and the factors that are significantly associated with frequent communication. In addition, this study investigates the extent to which frequent SLP–caregiver communication is associated with change in language and literacy abilities of children.

Method To address the study aims, weekly communication logs from 73 SLPs, serving 3–5 children with language impairment in grades K-2, were collected for a complete academic year. Logs detailed the frequency and nature of SLP–caregiver communication. Information regarding children's age, language ability, and socioeconomic status were gathered at study onset; additionally, SLPs completed a questionnaire about their work experience and current work conditions (e.g., caseload size and job satisfaction). Finally, children were administered grammar, vocabulary, and early literacy assessments at the beginning and end of the academic year.

Results Descriptive results indicate that (a) the most common type of communication was via homework, (b) children's socioeconomic status was related to communication frequency, and (c) increased SLP–caregiver communication related to increased grammar gains over the academic year.

Conclusion These results suggest that SLP–caregiver communication may be important for children's language outcomes; further studies exploring ways to support these communicative efforts are warranted.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grant R324A090012 from the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, to Laura M. Justice. We acknowledge the efforts of the STEPS project staff and research assistants, including Karie Wilson, Allison Alexander, and Kate Fresh. We are particularly thankful to the speech-language pathologists, classroom teachers, families, and students who participated in this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access