Training Direct-Care Staff to Provide Communication Intervention to Adults With Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review Purpose The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate studies on training direct-care staff to provide communication intervention to adults with intellectual disability. Method Systematic searches identified 22 studies. These were summarized and evaluated in terms of (a) participants; (b) settings; (c) training aims and procedures; ... Review Article
Review Article  |   November 08, 2017
Training Direct-Care Staff to Provide Communication Intervention to Adults With Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larah van der Meer
    School of Education, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Tamyra Matthews
    School of Education, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Emily Ogilvie
    School of Education, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Alice Berry
    School of Education, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Hannah Waddington
    School of Education, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Susan Balandin
    School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
  • Mark F. O'Reilly
    Department of Special Education, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Giulio Lancioni
    Department of Neuroscience and Sense Organs, University of Bari, Italy
  • Jeff Sigafoos
    School of Education, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jeff Sigafoos: jeff.sigafoos@vuw.ac.nz
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Nancy Brady
    Associate Editor: Nancy Brady×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Review Articles
Review Article   |   November 08, 2017
Training Direct-Care Staff to Provide Communication Intervention to Adults With Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2017, Vol. 26, 1279-1295. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0125
History: Received July 6, 2016 , Revised March 7, 2017 , Accepted June 16, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2017, Vol. 26, 1279-1295. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0125
History: Received July 6, 2016; Revised March 7, 2017; Accepted June 16, 2017

Purpose The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate studies on training direct-care staff to provide communication intervention to adults with intellectual disability.

Method Systematic searches identified 22 studies. These were summarized and evaluated in terms of (a) participants; (b) settings; (c) training aims and procedures; (d) research designs; (e) reliability, integrity, and social validity; (f) outcomes; (g) generalization and follow-up; and (h) certainty of evidence.

Results A total of 437 staff and 254+ adults with intellectual disability participated. Staff training most frequently involved combinations of verbal instruction, role play, modeling, practice, and feedback. Reliability was assessed in 18 studies with acceptable standards for most of these studies. Treatment integrity and social validity were assessed in 1 and 3 studies, respectively, with positive outcomes. Generalization and maintenance were assessed in 5 and 8 studies, respectively, with predominantly positive outcomes. Most studies reported positive outcomes for staff and positive or mixed outcomes for the adults with intellectual disability. Certainty of evidence was rated as conclusive in 1 study, suggestive in 14 studies, and inconclusive in 7 studies.

Conclusions There is sufficient evidence to conclude that direct-care staff can be taught to provide effective communication intervention to adults with intellectual disability. Professionals involved in providing training and support to direct-care staff could expect positive outcomes from multicomponent training programs that include opportunities for practice and feedback.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this manuscript was supported by a grant awarded to Victoria University of Wellington by the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC Reference 14/552).
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