Speech Situation Checklist–Revised: Investigation With Adults Who Do Not Stutter and Treatment-Seeking Adults Who Stutter Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the Speech Situation Checklist for adults who stutter (SSC) in differentiating people who stutter (PWS) from speakers with no stutter based on self-reports of anxiety and speech disruption in communicative settings. The SSC's psychometric properties were examined, norms ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   September 06, 2017
Speech Situation Checklist–Revised: Investigation With Adults Who Do Not Stutter and Treatment-Seeking Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martine Vanryckeghem
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Michael Matthews
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Peixin Xu
    University of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Disclosure: The first author, Martine Vanryckeghem, is the coauthor of the Speech Situation Checklist and has a nonfinancial relationship with the self-report test described in this article. The other authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The first author, Martine Vanryckeghem, is the coauthor of the Speech Situation Checklist and has a nonfinancial relationship with the self-report test described in this article. The other authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Martine Vanryckeghem: martinev@ucf.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage
    Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   September 06, 2017
Speech Situation Checklist–Revised: Investigation With Adults Who Do Not Stutter and Treatment-Seeking Adults Who Stutter
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0170
History: Received October 2, 2016 , Revised January 16, 2017 , Accepted April 13, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0170
History: Received October 2, 2016; Revised January 16, 2017; Accepted April 13, 2017

Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the Speech Situation Checklist for adults who stutter (SSC) in differentiating people who stutter (PWS) from speakers with no stutter based on self-reports of anxiety and speech disruption in communicative settings. The SSC's psychometric properties were examined, norms were established, and suggestions for treatment were formulated.

Method The SSC was administered to 88 PWS seeking treatment and 209 speakers with no stutter between the ages of 18 and 62. The SSC consists of 2 sections investigating negative emotional reaction and speech disruption in 38 speech situations that are identical in both sections.

Results The SSC–Emotional Reaction and SSC–Speech Disruption data show that these self-report tests differentiate PWS from speakers with no stutter to a statistically significant extent and have great discriminative value. The tests have good internal reliability, content, and construct validity. Age and gender do not affect the scores of the PWS.

Conclusions The SSC–Emotional Reaction and SSC–Speech Disruption seem to be powerful measures to investigate negative emotion and speech breakdown in an array of speech situations. The item scores give direction to treatment by suggesting speech situations that need a clinician's attention in terms of generalization and carry-over of within-clinic therapeutic gains into in vivo settings.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank the individuals who responded to the Behavior Assessment Battery self-report tests and the board-certified fluency specialists who participated in this study.
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