Influence of Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Variables on Generalization and Maintenance Following Phonomotor Treatment for Aphasia Purpose Although phonomotor treatment shows promise as an effective intervention for anomia in people with aphasia, responses to this treatment are not consistent across individuals. To better understand this variability, we examined the influence of 5 participant characteristics—age, time postonset, aphasia severity, naming impairment, and error profile—on generalization and maintenance ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   August 22, 2017
Influence of Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Variables on Generalization and Maintenance Following Phonomotor Treatment for Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca Hunting Pompon
    Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Lauren Bislick
    Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kristen Elliott
    Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Elizabeth Brookshire Madden
    School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Irene Minkina
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Megan Oelke
    Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Diane Kendall
    Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Lauren Bislick is now with the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Central Florida, Orlando
    Lauren Bislick is now with the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Central Florida, Orlando×
  • Kristen Elliott is now at the Cuyuna Regional Medical Center, Crosby, MN
    Kristen Elliott is now at the Cuyuna Regional Medical Center, Crosby, MN×
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rebecca Hunting Pompon, who is now in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program at the University of Delaware, Newark: rhp@udel.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage
    Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   August 22, 2017
Influence of Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Variables on Generalization and Maintenance Following Phonomotor Treatment for Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0175
History: Received October 10, 2016 , Revised February 10, 2017 , Accepted March 14, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0175
History: Received October 10, 2016; Revised February 10, 2017; Accepted March 14, 2017

Purpose Although phonomotor treatment shows promise as an effective intervention for anomia in people with aphasia, responses to this treatment are not consistent across individuals. To better understand this variability, we examined the influence of 5 participant characteristics—age, time postonset, aphasia severity, naming impairment, and error profile—on generalization and maintenance of confrontation naming and discourse abilities following phonomotor treatment.

Method Using retrospective data from 26 participants with aphasia who completed a 6-week phonomotor treatment program, we examined the relationships between participant characteristics of interest and change scores on confrontation naming and discourse tasks, measured pretreatment, immediately following treatment, and 3 months following treatment.

Results Although the participant characteristics of aphasia severity and error profile appeared to predict generalization to improved confrontation naming of untrained items and discourse performance, a post hoc analysis revealed that no one characteristic predicted generalization across participants at 3 months posttreatment.

Conclusions Response to phonomotor treatment does not appear to be influenced by aphasia and anomia severity level, error profile, participant age, or time postonset. Other factors, however, may influence response to intensive aphasia treatment and are worthy of continued exploration.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by Veterans Administration RR&D Merit Review Grant C6572R (awarded to Diane Kendall). The authors would like to thank the participants and their families for their contributions to this research.
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