Quantity Matters: Children With Dyslexia Are Impaired in a Small, but Not Large, Number of Exposures During Implicit Repeated Sequence Learning Purpose The present study investigated the onset of statistical learning and examined whether the number of exposures to a repeated sequence influences the learning performance of children with dyslexia on a serial reaction time task. Method Three groups of children (29 with dyslexia, 29 age-matched controls, and 30 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 08, 2017
Quantity Matters: Children With Dyslexia Are Impaired in a Small, but Not Large, Number of Exposures During Implicit Repeated Sequence Learning
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Xinjie He
    Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam
  • Shelley Xiuli Tong
    Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Xiuli Tong: xltong@hku.hk
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Wolter
    Associate Editor: Julie Wolter×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 08, 2017
Quantity Matters: Children With Dyslexia Are Impaired in a Small, but Not Large, Number of Exposures During Implicit Repeated Sequence Learning
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2017, Vol. 26, 1080-1091. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-15-0190
History: Received December 7, 2015 , Revised July 10, 2016 , Accepted March 7, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2017, Vol. 26, 1080-1091. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-15-0190
History: Received December 7, 2015; Revised July 10, 2016; Accepted March 7, 2017

Purpose The present study investigated the onset of statistical learning and examined whether the number of exposures to a repeated sequence influences the learning performance of children with dyslexia on a serial reaction time task.

Method Three groups of children (29 with dyslexia, 29 age-matched controls, and 30 reading level–matched controls) were administered a serial reaction time task, and their statistical learning performances after a small and a large number of exposures (40 vs. 180 exposures) were recorded and compared.

Results Children with dyslexia showed impaired statistical learning after a small number of exposures to a sequence, but intact statistical learning after a large number of exposures. In contrast, the age-matched and reading level–matched control groups showed intact statistical learning after both small and large numbers of exposures. Children with dyslexia also exhibited a slower learning rate than either control group.

Conclusion These results suggest that the amount of exposure to statistical patterns influences statistical learning performance in children with dyslexia.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported in part by the General Research Fund (Grant 17673216) from the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Research Grants Council to Xiuli Tong and Xinjie He and The University of Hong Kong Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research (Grant 201410159033) to Xiuli Tong. We are grateful to the children for their participation and to their parents and school principals for their generous support.
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