Reporting of Socioeconomic Status in Pediatric Language Research Purpose This study examined language-focused research articles published in 3 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association journals to: (a) determine the proportion that reported the socioeconomic status (SES) of pediatric participants and (b) identify the indicators used to represent SES in these articles. Method Researchers reviewed articles published from 2000–2015 in ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   August 15, 2017
Reporting of Socioeconomic Status in Pediatric Language Research
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ella Inglebret
    Washington State University, Spokane, WA
  • Shana Bailey
    Youthful Horizons, Spokane, WA
  • Jeanne Amie Clothiaux
    Eastern Washington University, Spokane, WA
  • Amy Skinder-Meredith
    Washington State University, Spokane, WA
  • Kayla Monson
    Washington State University, Spokane, WA
  • Lesli Cleveland
    Eastern Washington University, Spokane, WA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ella Inglebret: einglebret@wsu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Carol Miller
    Associate Editor: Carol Miller×
Article Information
Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   August 15, 2017
Reporting of Socioeconomic Status in Pediatric Language Research
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2017, Vol. 26, 1042-1052. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0229
History: Received November 21, 2016 , Revised March 24, 2017 , Accepted May 5, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2017, Vol. 26, 1042-1052. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0229
History: Received November 21, 2016; Revised March 24, 2017; Accepted May 5, 2017

Purpose This study examined language-focused research articles published in 3 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association journals to: (a) determine the proportion that reported the socioeconomic status (SES) of pediatric participants and (b) identify the indicators used to represent SES in these articles.

Method Researchers reviewed articles published from 2000–2015 in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, and the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (language section) that involved pediatric participants and focused on language development, as well as on assessment and intervention for language disorders.

Results For the 3 journals combined, 417 out of the total 652 (64%) pediatric language articles reported SES of the participants. Over the 16-year period there was an increase in SES reporting of 31.8% (55.6% to 73.3%). The types of SES indicators used represented education, income, and occupation.

Conclusion Although SES reporting for pediatric participants in language-based studies increased over the 16-year period examined, over 1 quarter of studies published in the 3 journals combined still do not report SES. This is a concern. When determining the generalizability of research findings to specific children, it is important for speech-language pathologists to be able to identify the SES background of research participants.

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