Language Sampling With Adolescents: Building a Normative Database With Fables Purpose The goal of the study was to create a language sampling task appropriate for adolescents and to contribute normative data from speakers with typical language development. Method Thirty adolescents (mean age = 14 years, 1 month) participated in an interview that involved the retelling and interpretation of ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   July 17, 2017
Language Sampling With Adolescents: Building a Normative Database With Fables
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn A. Nippold
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Laura M. Vigeland
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Megan W. Frantz-Kaspar
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Jeannene M. Ward-Lonergan
    University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Marilyn A. Nippold: nippold@uoregon.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Carol Miller
    Associate Editor: Carol Miller×
Article Information
Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 17, 2017
Language Sampling With Adolescents: Building a Normative Database With Fables
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0181
History: Received October 17, 2016 , Revised January 10, 2017 , Accepted March 17, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0181
History: Received October 17, 2016; Revised January 10, 2017; Accepted March 17, 2017

Purpose The goal of the study was to create a language sampling task appropriate for adolescents and to contribute normative data from speakers with typical language development.

Method Thirty adolescents (mean age = 14 years, 1 month) participated in an interview that involved the retelling and interpretation of 4 Greek fables. Each speaker's performance on the task was audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and entered into the Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts computer program (Miller & Iglesias, 2015). Samples were analyzed statistically for language productivity and syntactic complexity. In addition, each participant's perspective on the moral messages of the fables was examined informally.

Results The Fables task was effective in prompting adolescents to use complex language and in encouraging them to express their opinions about the moral messages. Although boys and girls did not differ in their performance on the task, some fables were more effective than others at eliciting spoken language and complex syntax. Moreover, the adolescents tended to agree with the moral messages of the fables and appeared to find them relevant to their lives.

Conclusion The Fables task has potential for clinical use with adolescents. Research is necessary to expand the normative database to include larger and more diverse groups of adolescents.

Acknowledgments
The authors express sincere gratitude to the adolescents who participated in this study; their parents or guardians; the research assistants who helped with data collection and analysis; and the teachers and administrators who assisted with participant recruitment and scheduling.
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