Ecologically Valid Assessment of Prospective Memory for Task Planning and Execution by Adults With Acquired Brain Injury Purpose Individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) often struggle due to inadequate planning and execution skills for completing nonroutine tasks. This study's purpose was to pilot ecologically valid procedures to assess planning for and execution of prospective daily activities. Method Participants included 9 adults with histories of severe ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   July 03, 2017
Ecologically Valid Assessment of Prospective Memory for Task Planning and Execution by Adults With Acquired Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica Brown
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Karen Hux
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jessica Brown: brow4565@umn.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer
    Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 03, 2017
Ecologically Valid Assessment of Prospective Memory for Task Planning and Execution by Adults With Acquired Brain Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0092
History: Received June 7, 2016 , Revised November 22, 2016 , Accepted January 29, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0092
History: Received June 7, 2016; Revised November 22, 2016; Accepted January 29, 2017

Purpose Individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) often struggle due to inadequate planning and execution skills for completing nonroutine tasks. This study's purpose was to pilot ecologically valid procedures to assess planning for and execution of prospective daily activities.

Method Participants included 9 adults with histories of severe ABI and 9 controls. Data collection included both prospective task planning and execution. First, participants created a plan for later execution of daily tasks in accordance with preestablished rules. Over the subsequent 10 days, participants independently attempted task completion. Differences within and between participant groups regarding planning and task performance were evaluated statistically and through examiner observation.

Results Participants with ABI implemented minimal planning strategies. They demonstrated highly variable performance and displayed substantially greater difficulty initiating and successfully executing tasks in adherence to rules than participants without ABI.

Conclusions Evaluating planning strategies and execution of novel prospective tasks is a crucial but often neglected aspect of assessment following ABI. Implementing ecologically valid procedures to evaluate this aspect of functioning can reveal individual strengths and challenges and provide guidance for developing effective intervention programs. Examining potential roles played by planning and strategy execution provides critical assessment information relating to independent living.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Jeffry Snell, Heath Mlnarik, the Quality Living staff, and the individuals who served as participants for their support in performing this study.
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