Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The Relationship Between Awareness of Errors in Word Productions and Treatment Outcomes Purpose Awareness of errors has been considered a clinical feature of acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). However, there is limited research examining error awareness in speakers with AOS. The purpose of this investigation was to examine awareness of errors and explore the relationship between awareness of errors and treatment outcomes ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 22, 2017
Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The Relationship Between Awareness of Errors in Word Productions and Treatment Outcomes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shannon C. Mauszycki
    VA Salt Lake City Healthcare System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Dallin J. Bailey
    VA Salt Lake City Healthcare System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Julie L. Wambaugh
    VA Salt Lake City Healthcare System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Dallin Bailey is now at the Department of Communication Disorders at Auburn University, AL.
    Dallin Bailey is now at the Department of Communication Disorders at Auburn University, AL.×
  • Correspondence to Shannon C. Mauszycki: passbrat@aol.com
  • Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Editor: Nancy Solomon×
  • Associate Editor: Adam Jacks
    Associate Editor: Adam Jacks×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Clinical Science and Implications / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 22, 2017
Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The Relationship Between Awareness of Errors in Word Productions and Treatment Outcomes
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 664-673. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0111
History: Received June 16, 2016 , Revised September 30, 2016 , Accepted February 23, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 664-673. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0111
History: Received June 16, 2016; Revised September 30, 2016; Accepted February 23, 2017

Purpose Awareness of errors has been considered a clinical feature of acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). However, there is limited research examining error awareness in speakers with AOS. The purpose of this investigation was to examine awareness of errors and explore the relationship between awareness of errors and treatment outcomes in speakers with AOS.

Method Twenty speakers with AOS and aphasia produced mono- and multisyllabic words in a repetition task. Following each production, speakers were asked to judge the accuracy of their production (i.e., correct or incorrect). Then, speakers received Sound Production Treatment.

Results Judgment accuracy of productions for the group ranged from 20% to 96%. There was a weak relationship between judgment accuracy and probe performance at posttreatment (r = .47) and a moderate relationship between judgment accuracy and probe performance at follow-up (r = .53).

Conclusion Findings indicate that speakers with AOS varied in their ability to judge the accuracy of their productions. For some speakers, the ability to judge the accuracy of their productions did not coincide with their production accuracy of treatment stimuli at posttreatment and at follow-up. Further research is needed to explore the relationship between error awareness and treatment outcomes.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Merit Review Awards RX-000363-01A1 and RX001365-01 (awarded to Julie L. Wambaugh), Research Career Scientist Award 23727 (awarded to Julie L. Wambaugh), and Career Development Award RX000749-01 (awarded to Shannon C. Mauszycki) from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service. The contents do not represent the views of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States government. Thanks are extended to Sandra Wright, Christina Nessler, Catharine DeLong, Kiera Berggren, Jessica Brunsvold, and Nicole Dingus for their assistance with this project.
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