Quantification and Systematic Characterization of Stuttering-Like Disfluencies in Acquired Apraxia of Speech Purpose The purpose of this article is to quantify and describe stuttering-like disfluencies in speakers with acquired apraxia of speech (AOS), utilizing the Lidcombe Behavioural Data Language (LBDL). Additional purposes include measuring test–retest reliability and examining the effect of speech sample type on disfluency rates. Method Two types ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Quantification and Systematic Characterization of Stuttering-Like Disfluencies in Acquired Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dallin J. Bailey
    Veterans Affairs Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Michael Blomgren
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Catharine DeLong
    Veterans Affairs Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Kiera Berggren
    Veterans Affairs Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Julie L. Wambaugh
    Veterans Affairs Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Dallin J. Bailey, who is now at Auburn University, AL: dallinbailey@gmail.com
  • Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Editor: Nancy Solomon×
  • Associate Editor: Adam Jacks
    Associate Editor: Adam Jacks×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Fluency Disorders / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Clinical Science and Implications / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Quantification and Systematic Characterization of Stuttering-Like Disfluencies in Acquired Apraxia of Speech
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 641-648. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0108
History: Received June 15, 2016 , Revised September 23, 2016 , Accepted February 12, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 641-648. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0108
History: Received June 15, 2016; Revised September 23, 2016; Accepted February 12, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this article is to quantify and describe stuttering-like disfluencies in speakers with acquired apraxia of speech (AOS), utilizing the Lidcombe Behavioural Data Language (LBDL). Additional purposes include measuring test–retest reliability and examining the effect of speech sample type on disfluency rates.

Method Two types of speech samples were elicited from 20 persons with AOS and aphasia: repetition of mono- and multisyllabic words from a protocol for assessing AOS (Duffy, 2013), and connected speech tasks (Nicholas & Brookshire, 1993). Sampling was repeated at 1 and 4 weeks following initial sampling. Stuttering-like disfluencies were coded using the LBDL, which is a taxonomy that focuses on motoric aspects of stuttering.

Results Disfluency rates ranged from 0% to 13.1% for the connected speech task and from 0% to 17% for the word repetition task. There was no significant effect of speech sampling time on disfluency rate in the connected speech task, but there was a significant effect of time for the word repetition task. There was no significant effect of speech sample type.

Conclusions Speakers demonstrated both major types of stuttering-like disfluencies as categorized by the LBDL (fixed postures and repeated movements). Connected speech samples yielded more reliable tallies over repeated measurements. Suggestions are made for modifying the LBDL for use in AOS in order to further add to systematic descriptions of motoric disfluencies in this disorder.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Merit Review Award RX-000363-01A1 (awarded to Julie Wambaugh) and Research Career Scientist Award 23727 (awarded to Julie Wambaugh) from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service. The contents do not represent the views of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States Government. Portions of these data were presented at the ASHA Convention in Denver, CO, in November 2015, and at the Conference on Motor Speech in Newport Beach, CA, in March 2016.
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