Perceptually Salient Sound Distortions and Apraxia of Speech: A Performance Continuum Purpose We sought to characterize articulatory distortions in apraxia of speech and aphasia with phonemic paraphasia and to evaluate the diagnostic validity of error frequency of distortion and distorted substitution in differentiating between these disorders. Method Study participants were 66 people with speech sound production difficulties after left-hemisphere ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Perceptually Salient Sound Distortions and Apraxia of Speech: A Performance Continuum
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katarina L. Haley
    Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Adam Jacks
    Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Jessica D. Richardson
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Julie L. Wambaugh
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, UT
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Katarina L. Haley: khaley@med.unc.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Editor: Nancy Solomon×
  • Associate Editor: Christopher Dromey
    Associate Editor: Christopher Dromey×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Clinical Science and Implications / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Perceptually Salient Sound Distortions and Apraxia of Speech: A Performance Continuum
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 631-640. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0103
History: Received June 15, 2016 , Revised September 13, 2016 , Accepted December 12, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 631-640. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0103
History: Received June 15, 2016; Revised September 13, 2016; Accepted December 12, 2016

Purpose We sought to characterize articulatory distortions in apraxia of speech and aphasia with phonemic paraphasia and to evaluate the diagnostic validity of error frequency of distortion and distorted substitution in differentiating between these disorders.

Method Study participants were 66 people with speech sound production difficulties after left-hemisphere stroke or trauma. They were divided into 2 groups on the basis of word syllable duration, which served as an external criterion for speaking rate in multisyllabic words and an index of likely speech diagnosis. Narrow phonetic transcriptions were completed for audio-recorded clinical motor speech evaluations, using 29 diacritic marks.

Results Partial voicing and altered vowel tongue placement were common in both groups, and changes in consonant manner and place were also observed. The group with longer word syllable duration produced significantly more distortion and distorted-substitution errors than did the group with shorter word syllable duration, but variations were distributed on a performance continuum that overlapped substantially between groups.

Conclusions Segment distortions in focal left-hemisphere lesions can be captured with a customized set of diacritic marks. Frequencies of distortions and distorted substitutions are valid diagnostic criteria for apraxia of speech, but further development of quantitative criteria and dynamic performance profiles is necessary for clinical utility.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R03DC011881 (awarded to Adam Jacks) and R03DC006163 (awarded to Katarina L. Haley). We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of Jordan Jarrett, Michael Smith, and Leigh Wallmeyer for conducting the narrow phonetic transcription and Tyson Harmon for helping with the speech-intelligibility testing.
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