The Nature of Error Consistency in Individuals With Acquired Apraxia of Speech and Aphasia Purpose The primary characteristics used to define acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) have evolved to better reflect a disorder of motor planning/programming. However, there is debate regarding the feature of relatively consistent error location and type. Method Ten individuals with acquired AOS and aphasia and 11 individuals with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
The Nature of Error Consistency in Individuals With Acquired Apraxia of Speech and Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren Bislick
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Malcolm McNeil
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Veterans Administration Pittsburgh Health Care System, Pennsylvania
  • Kristie A. Spencer
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn Yorkston
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Diane L. Kendall
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
    Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington
    University of Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lauren Bislick: lauren.bislick@ucf.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Editor: Nancy Solomon×
  • Associate Editor: Adam Jacks
    Associate Editor: Adam Jacks×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Clinical Science and Implications / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
The Nature of Error Consistency in Individuals With Acquired Apraxia of Speech and Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 611-630. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0080
History: Received May 19, 2016 , Revised September 6, 2016 , Accepted March 10, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 611-630. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0080
History: Received May 19, 2016; Revised September 6, 2016; Accepted March 10, 2017

Purpose The primary characteristics used to define acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) have evolved to better reflect a disorder of motor planning/programming. However, there is debate regarding the feature of relatively consistent error location and type.

Method Ten individuals with acquired AOS and aphasia and 11 individuals with aphasia without AOS participated in this study. In the context of a 2-group experimental design, error consistency was examined via 5 repetitions of 30 multisyllabic words. The influence of error rate, severity of impairment, and stimulus presentation condition (blocked vs. random) on error consistency was also explored, as well as between-groups differences in the types of errors produced.

Results Groups performed similarly on consistency of error location; however, adults with AOS demonstrated greater variability of error type in a blocked presentation condition only. Stimulus presentation condition, error rate, and severity of impairment did not influence error consistency in either group. Groups differed in the production of phonetic errors (e.g., sound distortions) but not phonemic errors.

Conclusions Overall, findings do not support relatively consistent errors as a differentiating characteristic of AOS.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant F31DC 013947, awarded to Lauren Bislick. The authors acknowledge Melissa Helen, Christi Quilligan, Lisa Bjorback, Katrina Ross, Laura Cain, Josie Stump, and all participants and their families for their contributions to this study.
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